How to get a German Residence Card (Aufenthaltskarte) through Marriage

Back to immigrating to Germany

I recently moved to Germany and was able to get a residence permit that was valid for five years along with permission to work. Contrary to what I heard, the entire process was actually simple- after three months I received the card and the only costs I incurred were the price of the permit, about 30 euros, 80 euros for a translated document, and the cost of buying health insurance (about 280 euros for six months). I was eligible for the residence permit as a citizen from outside the EU because I married an EU citizen who has registered her right to live in Germany.

This guide will cover the process I went through which is essentially the same for foreigners from non-EU countries coming to Germany to live with their spouse who is:

  • An EU-member registered to live in Germany
  • A German citizen or permanent resident

Note that moving to Germany for either of these two reasons also entitles you to have the right to work and you don’t need to do anything extra for this in your application.

Also note that same-sex marriages conducted in foreign countries are recognized in Germany as legal civil partnerships that also carry the rights of a residence card and work permit. More about this in the comments below (posted July 13, 2015)

There are three basic steps regarding how to get a German residence card or aufenthaltskarte:

  1. Get to Germany
  2. Register your name and address with your local municipality (Einwohnermeldeamt)
  3. Apply for the residence card/aufenthaltskarte
  4. Notes on required documents
  5. Terms and Vocabulary

Finally it should be distinguished that there are three different types of residence cards, and this information is for the first listed here, which is valid for five years:

  • Aufenthaltskarte Residence Permit: required for non-EU third country nationals, valid for five years, and does not necessarily grant the right to work
  • Niederlassungserlaugnis Unlimited Residence Permit: issued after someone has been legally living in Germany for at least five years and can meet certain income and language requirements
  • Blue Card EU: this is for workers with specialized skills who want to come to Germany for a job and requires meeting university degree, salary, and career qualifications

Step 1. Getting to Germany

Depending on a person’s circumstances, simply getting to Germany may prove to be the first significant obstacle to overcome. Below are some of the circumstances people may find themselves in.

Visa Requirement: Depending on your nationality you may also need to have a visa to enter Germany. If you are required to have a visa to travel to Germany, this in itself legally acts as a residence permit and you can find more information about applying for these here. The German Federal Foreign Office maintains a comprehensive list of nationalities that do and do not require an entry visa. Some common countries that do not require entry visas include:

  • EU/EEA member states
  • United States
  • Australia
  • Japan
  • Argentina
  • Brazil
  • Chile
  • Canada
  • South Korea
  • Mexico
  • Singapore

If you enter Germany and you are not required to have a visa, you must register your name and the address where you are living with the Einwohnermeldeamt (municipal registration office, usually located in the rathaus) within two weeks of your arrival.

Language Requirement: Recent legislation has now mandated a German language requirement for certain people. Even if you have already married abroad, to join your German spouse you now must show that you have a basic level of knowledge of the German language if your spouse has not previously registered his or her right of residence in a different EU country. As a non-EU member spouse, you can prove this language requirement at the Germany embassy or consulate in your home country by completing the first level of a German language course from a well known institute, for example the Start Deutsch 1 course offered by the Goethe Institut. If you cannot reasonably complete a course or do not pass the course after trying for a year then you are exempt from this requirement.

I found this requirement to be particularly funny because it only applies to foreign spouses moving to German citizens who have not lived abroad in another EU country. As a spouse moving to Germany to join your partner, you do not need to meet this language requirement if:

  • Either you or your partner is from an EU-member state (excluding Germany) or Norway, Liechtenstein, Iceland, or Switzerland
  • Your spouse is a German citizen who has previously taken advantage of his or her right of movement in Europe

Step 2. Registering with Your Local Municiaplity: Einwohnermeldeamt

According to the official phrasing, if you intend to stay longer than 90 days in Germany you must register at your local municipality’s city hall (rathaus) within two weeks of your arrival in the country. Germans are supposed to do this as well thanks to a law targeting radical militant groups operating in the country in the 1970s, but nowadays many do not register with their municipality to protest the invasion of privacy, and face a fine of 35 euros.

Registering at your local rathaus is simple- you just need to bring your passport and rental contract for the place you are living and that’s it. In my case I could not immediately register as “married” because I found out that to do this I needed to have my marriage certificate translated into German. However I did register as “single” which kept me legal and once I had a translated marriage certificate I re-registered as married. If you can get your marriage certificate translated in time you can bring this with you when you initially register and get everything done in one visit.

And a note on translations: these must be done by a German government-sanctioned translator who will give you an official stamp (just do an internet search and find out if the person or company is a certified translator for official German government documents). I sent mine to a translator by mail, and one week and 80 euros later was holding an official translation in my hand.

Once your registration is complete you will receive an official copy when you leave (this document is called your anmeldebestätigung, or certificate of registration). Note that you have just completed the process of registering with your municipality (einwohnermeldeamt), a step on your way to making an application for a residence permit. On that note, don’t forget to ask if your rathaus has an application for an aufenthaltskarte (residence permit)- they often do.

A few important details about when you register

First, you will be asked what religion you are. If you say that you are a particular religion you will have to pay a 1% income tax to the government each month, who in turn supposedly uses this money to support your religious institution. If you say you are not religious you will not be charged this tax, but in the future if you want to have some sort of religious event (wedding, funeral, baptism, etc) you may run into difficulties finding a place of worship where you can do this.

Second, the GEZ tax. There is a convoluted history about the GEZ tax, which is collected to support broadcasting (like a TV/radio fee), and technically isn’t a tax even though everyone must pay it. Until January 2013 you could avoid paying this if you did not own a TV, radio, or have access to the internet (and you may have needed to avoid volunteer inspectors who would come to your door and try and trick you into revealing a hidden TV). Now to simplify things everyone must pay this.

It comes out to something like 18.50 euros each month, and if you don’t pay it you will be fined a thousand euros or some such (I haven’t heard of this happening since the new system went into action in 2013). The reason this segment is included here is because a private company combs through rathaus civil registrations looking for new people and then reports its findings to a different company affiliated with the state that collects the so-called GEZ tax. So once you register you can expect to start getting letters in the mail requesting you to pay your monthly fee. However one of the rules that came into effect as of 2013 stipulates that the GEZ fee will not accumulate for the months you do not pay it. Anyway you have bigger things to worry about now like getting your residence permit.

And finally, remember that law that says you must register within two weeks of arriving in Germany if you intend to stay longer than 90 days. If you don’t do this you can theoretically be fined 500 euros. However this is obviously ambiguous because of the phrasing, “intend to stay.” Who is to say when you began, “intending to stay,” but if it reassures you, in my case I registered about 50 days after I arrived in Germany and everything was fine.

Step 3. Applying for a Residence Permit / Aufenthaltskarte

Now that you have an anmeldebestätigung (certificate of registration with your local municipality) you can begin to get things in order to submit with your application for a residence permit/aufenthaltskarte. The German Foreign Office considerately offers an application for a residence permit/aufenthaltskarte in several languages:

Once you complete this application you should turn it in along with all your required paperwork to your Landratsamt office, specifically to the Ordnungsamt (regulatory) department. This is the main governmental office for your district or region where you live (not your state) and will probably be located in the nearest bigger city that is in your area. You can always find the location of your landratsamt by asking at your local rathaus. For example, the Landratsamt for Heidelberg is the Rhein-Neckar-Kreis Landratsamt.

This is what you will need to include with your residence permit/aufenthaltskarte:

  • Copy of your passport showing your name, picture, and expiration date
  • Copy of your health insurance
  • Two biometric photos
  • Proof of your income or employment, needs to be at least around 700 euros per month and can be in the form of a letter from your employer, bank statements, or adequate savings statements
  • Marriage certificate in German
  • Your anmeldebestätigung (municipal registration certificate)
  • Identification Card

A few days after I mailed all this in I received my federal tax identification number, and then a few weeks later (about three) had my final appointment at the Landratsamt. This part was easy: I showed up, they took my fingerprints, asked me how tall I was, and that was basically it. I received a piece of paper with instructions on submitting about 30 euros to a bank account to pay for my residence permit and three weeks later I got a notice from my local rathaus that I could go there to pick up my residence permit, valid for five years with the authorization for me to work legally in Germany.

Part 4. Notes on Required Items

The required items you need to submit raise some obvious questions, beginning with health insurance. After I submitted my application to the Landratsamt I got a letter about a week later saying I needed to submit some additional things, and the information I learned then will now be included in the following details.

Health Insurance – how much coverage do you need and for how long do you need it?

When I initially mailed in my application I had roughly a month until my current health insurance expired- it was a policy for emergency coverage of up to 55,000 euros, and cost about 35 euros a month (I found it by searching the web). I bought the same policy for the maximum amount of time my company allowed (six months), printed off the actual part of their website that said the maximum future coverage I could buy was six months, and resent this to the landratsamt.

Proof of Income or Employment – In my case I’m self-employed so I printed out my most recent eight months of deposits from my bank account and this worked. I was actually surprised here because I thought there would be a much stricter investigation of my earnings than just a look through my deposit history.

Identification Card – This was another item I was asked to resubmit. At first I sent my home-state’s ID card which I suspected wouldn’t be accepted because it was not issued by my country’s federal government. However I didn’t want to be separated from my passport so when I got a letter asking for this I responded with a letter saying it was the law that I always keep my passport with me. I couldn’t believe this either but that worked and my application proceeded to go through.

Part 5. Terms and Vocabulary

Aufenthaltskarte – Residence Card

Einwohnermeldeamt – Municipal Registration Office, usually located in the rathaus

Rathaus – City Hall

Anmeldebestätigung – Certificate of Registration

Landratsamt – Government office for your district or region (below the state level)

Ordnungsamt – Regulatory Department of the Landratsamt

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Comment Directory

Please note that I’m just an average person who got a residence permit in Germany. Perhaps I can offer useful suggestions for you if you are in a very similar situation as myself. Otherwise, I really can’t provide you with any better information than what you would find on the BAMF website.

If you have questions about immigrating to Germany that aren’t based on my own situation (and even if you do), please check through the following links and comment directory. Feel free to ask any question, as I hope someone out there who was in a similar situation might be reading and leave you a relevant answer. I’ll periodically organize questions and sort them by category, however I can’t guarantee a response.

Most important of all, I would encourage anyone who asks a question to post back later with details about how their situation turns out. This is where we can all get the most valuable details.

If you have further questions about immigration after reviewing this page please see the Ask a Question page.

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English speakers living in Germany will also find many helpful suggestions through the website Toytown Germany.

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247 thoughts on “How to get a German Residence Card (Aufenthaltskarte) through Marriage

  1. Anonymous

    I’m a US national living in Berlin. I got married to a non-German EU-member-state woman and have an Aufenthaltskarte. I was wondering what happens after that? Can I then apply for permanent residency and not have to worry about visa appointments in the future?

    Thanks for any insights,

    Reply
    1. Administrator

      Hello and thanks for your question,

      You can probably find most of the answer to your question here:
      http://www.bamf.de/EN/DasBAMF/Aufgaben/Daueraufenthalt/daueraufenthalt-node.html

      You will notice there are five points on the list that apply to you to be eligible for permanent residence:

      –Having uninterrupted five-year legal residence in Germany
      securing a livelihood (including adequate health and care insurance) with long-term and regular income
      –Fulfilling tax obligations and adequate provision for old age
      –Acquiring an adequate knowledge of the German language, basic knowledge of the legal and social systems and living conditions in Germany, such as can be acquired from attending an integration course, for example
      –Representing no risk to public security and order by violating the legal system (in particular criminal law), for example, or by taking part in extremist or terrorist activities
      –Having adequate living space

      You probably don’t need to worry about most of those. There are three things that stick out: the German language requirement, health care requirement, and provisions for old age.

      As for the language requirement, this isn’t too difficult even if you never plan to learn German. The law states you need to have A1 or B1 language skills, but this is currently being debated (http://www.dw.de/european-court-overturns-law-requiring-german-language-skills-for-spouse-visas/a-17772143).  You might as well develop your skills to the B1 level just to be safe- that’s not hard, basically survival German. And maybe you even plan on learning German anyway. If you go from A1 to B1 the German government even offers an integration scholarship that will reduce the cost of your German courses by 50 percent once you have reached the B1 level.

      If you are working full-time for a German employer you will have health insurance and retirement taken care of. If not you need to get those things in order before you can apply for permanent residence.

      I was able to get the 5-year residency card with the most basic travel health insurance ($35/month) so I suspect this could also work for the permanent residence card. If you find you need German insurance this is at minimum something like 300 euros per month if you are not employed full-time by a German employer (in which case this amount or more would be taken out of your monthly salary). There are a number of private and public health insurance companies you can buy in to.

      For the retirement/pension- I recently spoke with a German social worker who said the law states you need to have been paying into a pension/retirement system for 5-7 years (5 years if you speak German and have a steady German job, up to 7 years if your German is at the B1 level and your employment isn’t totally secure). Companies will typically allow you to buy into the pension system retroactively, ie you could buy five years’ worth now. Start checking with a pension company if you aren’t already in the system. Unlike the US where your pension is taken care of by your employer/Social Security, Germany has companies that are specifically for pensions. As far as how much this would cost- I was looking into this recently and remember seeing seeing a pension plan for something like 70 euros per month. Retroactively for five years this would be around 70x12x5= 4,200 euros. If you end up moving away from Germany there may also be ways to recover this money you spent.

      Hope this helps!

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      Reply
      1. nabin4me

        Really appreciate these pieces of informations.

        I have been married to EU citizen (non German). What is the next step after the marriage is registered?

        And I have 3 months valid visa left on my student residents card which I can under normal circumstances Renew after it expires as a students.

        Is it possible to apply for another residence card by submitting marriage certificate or i should wait till the current expires? What kind of documents I need to submit? I have 5000 euros in my account right now. Should I give proof that my spouse is working in germany? Or, it’s just enough showing that I am doing part-time work as a student.

        Finally ,will I apply at my own city or her city? How can I go about it?

    2. Joan

      Hi.. My husband is a Romanian and he is living and working in Germany.. I am a Filipino having two children in my previous partner.. Is it possible I can bring my two kids in Germany? My kids is 5years old and 6years old.. If I can bring there with me at the same time what is there requirements?

      Reply
      1. Administrator Post author

        Hello Joan,

        Yes, Germany’s Residence Act (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p0415) says you can bring your children if they are minors and you have a German residence permit.

        Here is the page from BAMF about how you can do this: http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/Arbeiten/Familiennachzug/familiennachzug-node.html

        Basically it says you have to have a large enough house/apartment and you must have secure income (and I assume they also consider your husband’s income as well).

        Hope this helps

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      2. Joan

        So it means I need to go in Germany first to get a residence permit before I can bring my kids?

      3. Administrator Post author

        I see what you mean- from how it reads on the website it sounds like you would have to first live in Germany before your kids could apply.

        I would imagine the government would realize it is impractical, and that you can bring your kids when you apply for a resident permit.

        I would guess that when you fill out your application for a residence card with the Landratsamt that there is a place to list your children, or you could all apply at the same time.

        Obviously you are wanting to be certain of this before you leave your country, so I would advise contacting the Landratsamt office for the region where you would be moving in Germany.

        Maybe someone else reading will also provide you with the specific method of applying for a residence card with children while in Germany.

        Good luck and hope this helps

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  2. daniel

    Hello, and thank you for this post!, I’m in almost the same situation and this is the most direct account of the proccess that I could find online. Would you mind sharing which health insurance you chose?
    Cheers!

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      Hi, my wife is romania,am not a eu citezen ,we decide to go to live in germany,i want ask if am the right to look for job there thank you

      Reply
      1. Administrator Post author

        Yes I believe you have the right to work in Germany, but for someone to hire you, you need a tax id number and probably residence permit. You get these once you register in the rathaus and apply for the residence permit. For many mini jobs the employers don’t ask for your tax id or residence permit. Good luck.

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    1. Administrator Post author

      Greetings,
      Yes, it is the same procedure for same sex marriages that took place in a foreign country.

      As of now, Germany doesn’t allow same-sex marriages, though it does allow same-sex civil partnerships. These partnerships are a legal status that brings many of the same rights as marriage (including a residence card/work permit), however and significantly, same-sex partners cannot get the same tax credits as officially married people nor can they adopt children together.

      As such, a foreign same-sex marriage is recognized in Germany as a same-sex civil partnership, and such a partnership makes you eligible for a residence card/work permit.

      Thanks for the question- I’ll make a note of this in the main body of this page above.

      Back to Comment Directory

      Reply
  3. Anonymous

    Hello, i am a non EU citizen in possession of an Aufenthalskarte when i got a baby with an EU citizen living in Germany. The EU citizen left Germany before the expiration of my 5 year stay and the authorities asked me to leave the country. How can i sort this out?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello,
      You have at least a few options- the first is to appeal the decision that you have to leave. You could also try to apply and extend your residence permit, and they may also make considerations for you if you are working for a German employer. For instance, if you have a suitable job and have lived in Germany for two years then you might be able to get a settlement permit.

      BAMF also has advice centers you can call or visit to get help with this, http://www.bamf.de/SiteGlobals/Functions/WebGIS/EN/WebGIS_Regionalstelle.html.

      Good luck!

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      Reply
      1. Sergey

        How do the authorities check if EU citizen left Germany? Do the German authorities watch for everyone non EU family member and their spouses? Is it legal ?

      2. Administrator Post author

        Here is an article that explains visas: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/visa-information-system/index_en.htm

        Basically it says all countries within the the EU/Schengen Zone can share information about your visa, and when you enter/leave the EU/Schengen zone. However there is no way to keep track of which country you are living in within the EU/Schengen zone once you are inside.

        Within Germany you are supposed to unregister with your local municipality once you leave the country, so this is one way the German authorities could tell you left the country.

        However realistically, you could just continue living in Germany and not register yourself with the municipality- but in this case you couldn’t really access any services (register a car, register for any city services) and it might interfere with getting a job, health insurance, etc.

        If you did this you also might run into trouble when you finally did leave the EU/Schengen zone and the authorities see that you’ve been there longer than 90 days.\

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      3. Sergey

        If I (non EU family member) and my spouse (citizen EU) would register themselves in local municipality but after my spouse (citizen EU) need would go out from EU/Schengen Zone for some time.
        So how long my spouse (citizen EU) can be out of EU in order that I, (non EU family member) do not loose my right (residence card-Aufenthalskarte) be in Germany as a non EU family member?

      4. Administrator Post author

        Maybe someone else reading this will have a good answer for you- for me I can tell that my spouse (EU citizen) left Germany for four months (un-registered from our municipality) while I (non-EU citizen) remained in Germany, and it was no problem.

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  4. John

    Hello
    Please clarify Language Requirement:
    My spouse is citizen of Romania. I am non EU family member. Must I pass exam in German language if I came together with my spouse to Germany?
    I have not seen obligations pass German language for Non EU family members http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/residence/documents-formalities/non-eu-family-members-residence-card/germany/index_en.htm

    After 3 months in your host country, your non-EU family members must register their residence with the relevant authorities (often the town hall or local police station).

    To obtain a residence card, they will need:

    a valid passport
    your registration certificate as an EU national or any other proof of your residence in the country
    proof of the family relationship with you (such as a marriage or birth certificate)
    for (grand)children, proof they are under 21 or dependent on you
    for (grand)parents, proof that they are dependent on you
    for other family members, proof that they are dependent on you or there are serious health ground requiring you to take personal care of them
    for unmarried partners, proof of a long-term or durable relationship with you
    No other documents may be requested.
    http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/residence/documents-formalities/non-eu-family-members-residence-card/index_en.htm#!lightbox-uid-0

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Greetings John and thanks for your questions,

      There is no German language requirement for you in your case for a five-year residence permit (aufenthalskarte). Ironically from what I’ve read on the BAMF website, if your spouse was a German citizen who had not lived abroad you would need to be able to speak at the A1 level. (http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/EhepartnerFamilie/ehepartnerfamilie-node.html)

      I got my residence card without needing to fulfill any language requirement. However if you want to get a permanent residence card you need to speak German at the B1 or B2 level.

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      Reply
      1. Jian

        Is there any exception to the language requirements A1 , if the foreign spouse is already in Germany and registered same address with his German spouse?

        The foreign spouse is a student and working, can understand little German but no certificate from any of these Goethe or testdaf.

  5. John

    “Proof of your income or employment, needs to be at least around 700 euros per month and can be in the form of a letter from your employer, bank statements, or adequate savings statements”
    Please explain. Should I submit only bank statement around 700 euros per month for proof of mine income? It would be very easy having just 700 euros to get Residence Card (Aufenthaltskarte) in Germany. I thought the sum must be spread for more long period of time (6 month)

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      I would say submit whatever you can to show that you have enough money (and employment) to support yourself while you live in Germany. What I did was submit my bank records showing regular deposits of around 700 euros per month, and these records stretched back six months (if you have older records that show regular income I would think that’s even better). I also submitted bank records showing my savings.

      Hope this helps!

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      Reply
      1. Sergey

        What about my spouse -citizen EU? Should she submit some documents? I have known that EU citizen must do following activities: Employment, Self-employment, Study,residing with sufficient resource,lookig for job…

      2. Administrator Post author

        As far as I know if you are an EU citizen you don’t need to do anything except register with the local municipality- and that is just a procedure, they don’t ask for proof of employment or that you are looking for a job.

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      3. Sergey

        Does your Residence Card (Aufenthaltstitel) as non EU Family member let you work in Germany? Does non EU Family member have right to work with Aufenthaltstitel in Germany? Can non EU Family member to work with Residence Card (Aufenthaltstitel)?

      4. Sergey

        Please clarify. So I am non EU citizen can I submit for getting the Residence Card my bank statement from non EU Bank,for example from Russian Bank? Or can I submit payslips from my employer from Russia?

      5. Administrator Post author

        I think you can submit both. I only submitted my bank statements from a foreign bank (USA)- they were all in English too, not in German. I would say print yours out in a way that clearly shows regular deposits and savings. You could even highlight those.

        What I brought were printed off from my bank website. I also suspect a lot depends on the person who handles your case/interview.

        Good luck

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  6. Igor

    Hello and I must thank you for being a very good source of information.I would like to ask you if you might know something about my case.My girlfriend is a citizen of EU myself non-EU citizen she is studying in Germany and have registered her staying here.We are planing to get married (we are together for now 2 years). Should we do it here in Germany or elsewere (Denmark)?And will I be permitted to work? I have on my bank account 5000 euros and I will get appropriate insurance.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Igor and thanks for the question,

      I’m not sure of the exact money requirement, however you have more in savings than I did when I first got my residence card. In addition to bank savings statements I also showed that I had regular income from being self-employed of about 800 euros per month (showing bank deposits for the past six months).

      Once you are married to an EU citizen who is registered in Germany then you as a non-EU citizen can also work (it took me about two-three weeks to get my tax number once I applied). That is all included with the residence card application.

      As for getting married in Denmark or Germany, I can’t say much on either because I wasn’t married in either. I would say just get married wherever it is easiest for you both, and then get your marriage certificate officially translated into German and you will be all set.

      Best of luck to you!

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      Reply
  7. Sergey

    Hello
    Have you met with demands for home size when you apply on Residence Card? Some people said that need 12 square meters per person.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Yes, I remember I needed my landlord to fill something out that said how big the place was. And yes, I believe the rule is you need 12 square meters per person (I think it is somewhat less if you are living in a dormitory).

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      Reply
      1. Sophie

        Hi, I am an EU citizen (British) who has just moved to Berlin, my husband (Colombian) is applying for the family reunification visa where if approved, he will apply for the residency card once he arrives in Germany. The embassy have requested proof of my income and a rental contract, my current subcontract states the size of the apartment, do you think this is enough or will they request an extra form to be filled in regarding accommodation size? Thanks

      2. Administrator Post author

        Hi Sophie, it sounds like you will be fine if your contract states the size already.

  8. Igor

    Hi Sergey,
    Yes,she is living in a small place,but it has 25 square m. so that’s about right.I would like to know how much money we have to have and is 5000 euros enough.

    Reply
  9. Mike

    Hi there. Thanks for all the info! Did the process for you exceed 90 days? I’m an Australian citizen and therefore am only eligible to be within the Schengen zone for 90 days out of a 180 day period. Slightly nervous about overrunning this duration if I start this process upon arrival in Germany (particularly late in the year with assumed delays over the holidays, and given I’ve already had a few days in Europe). Do you have any knowledge on whether starting the application process provides additional leeway on staying in the Schengen zone, or any other recommendations? Appreciate the help!

    Reply
    1. Stanislav

      I can tell you what it’s like in Poland (since Poland is in the EU, I believe the same works for Germany or any other EU country as well), when you apply for a RC of whatever EU country, they put a stamp into your pasport which allows you to stay in the country till your RC is issued. Even if it takes up to 6 months. But if you’re married to an EEA/EU national you can stay in Europe for as long as you wish, the RC is not obligatory but it CAN help you prove your residence right and right to work in the EU.

      Reply
      1. Mike

        Thank you, Stanislav. In the instance there is no bridging visa, would the application continue if I had to leave temporarily (and say, my wife, who is a German national, was still in the country)?

      2. Stanislav

        You can defenitely leave and move within the EU (shenghen zone, since there’re no borders), I’m not sure how it would work if you wanted to travel abroad (back to Australia) after the 3 month expiration period with just a stamp in your passport. You can do it before those 90 days expire but once this 3 month period has expired you cannot cross the border and have to wait till you get the desicion.
        I’m sure, when you come to the Office where you apply for a RC they will tell you how it works for the Australians, perhaps it will turn out that the Australians have some exceptions and more benefits, than other non-EU citizens, at last Australia is on the White List Country and on the Common Wealth List as well.

    2. Administrator Post author

      Hello Mike, yes my process went over 90 days and I just assumed I would be okay exceeding that because I was being processed. Not sure technically what the rules are though. It sounds like Stanislav has a better idea about that. Good luck
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      Reply
  10. dejan

    Hello, I have some questions,
    I am 24 years old. My Father have EU passport and my mother and sister have aufethalskarte(by my father) and now they live in Germany. I don`t have aufethalskarte and i live now in non-EU country. Can i now apply for aufenthals karte becouse i live alone in non-EU country and my family live in Germany and I am 24 old and I am unmarried? Thanks for answer.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Dejan, from reading this pamphlet it looks like you must be 18 years old or less to join your family.
      http://www.bamf.de/SharedDocs/Anlagen/EN/Publikationen/Broschueren/bildung-und-beruf-in-deutschland.pdf?__blob=publicationFile#page=29

      However it seems like there could be an exception for your case because your family is in Germany. I’m not familiar with this area of immigration, so I would recommend checking with the German embassy or consulate in your home country. Best of luck to you, and perhaps someone else reading has better information

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      Reply
  11. Babs

    Hello? I’m a family member of EU citizen from Sweden… she came and we got married here in Germany. she went back after the marriage and I’m here in Germany.. can I apply for the resident permit as a family member of EU citizen here in Germany… or what should I do to get my resident permit pls help me?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Babs,

      I believe you will run into problems applying for the residence permit in Germany (assuming you are a non-EU citizen) if your spouse is also not registered as living in Germany.

      This person was in a similar situation, and once the spouse left Germany this person also had to leave: (https://openbordersimmigration.com/residence-card-aufenthaltskarte-in-germany-through-marriage/#comment-115)

      If you are set on staying in Germany and getting a residence card through marriage then I think your spouse will need to register herself as living in Germany (Einwohnermeldeamt) at your local rathaus.

      Good luck!

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      Reply
      1. Babs

        Tnx for your concern.

        – How long it will take for her to registered when she comes..

        – Is she supose to work before she can registered.

        – How long I can aply for the permit. after she as registered.

        – Can I apply even if she is not working? tnx…

        Ca

      2. Administrator Post author

        Hello again Babs

        You basically just follow the process that is detailed on this page. Once you get the marriage license translated into German by an official translator you can register at the city hall immediately as a married couple. Neither of you need to be working to register at the city hall, but to get a residence permit you will have to show that you make enough to support yourself, or show that she makes enough to support you both.

        As for your other question about if she can go back to Sweden: I’m not sure how much communication the governments of Sweden and Germany have about that. Perhaps someone else reading will have something more to say on that topic.

        Hope you get it worked out

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    2. juliud

      Hello, if you and your wife lived in Germany for more than 5 years, then you have no problem but if less than, then you will be ask to live Germany. But if you have a job and you are not receiving any social benefit, then contact a lawyer.

      Reply
      1. Babs

        Tnx. Do you think she can still go back to Sweden after she have register to settled in Germany. she have a baby is she supose to register together with the baby. or you think she can live the baby in her country….

  12. John

    Hello,
    I have two passports. One passport have schengen visa but other passport do not have the visa.
    If I mail to Landratsamt the passport without schengen visa will it normal ? I do not want mail to Landratsamt the passport with the visa because the passport can be needed in any moment for movement to my home country. As I understand the Landratsamt need the passport just for identification of person, not for checking visa. Right ?
    And should I translate documents for Landratsamt into German language? Where can I find translators from Romanian or Russian language in Germany?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello John,

      First just confírm: you are a non-EU citizen wanting to get a residence card based on your marriage to an EU citizen.

      In my experience I didn’t need to send my passport, I just took it with me to show for ID when I went to the Landratsamt for my appointment.

      However I did have a Swedish residence permit, and they requested I send this in with my application. I wrote a letter explaining that I needed to keep this residence permit because I may need to travel to another EU country, and if I did not have this then I would have no proof that I had legally overstayed my 90 days. So, perhaps you could write a similar explanation about your passports- in any case maybe you can get around sending even one in by making an appointment to show them in person. Or maybe they would accept a copy of your passport. Maybe start by writing a letter explaining your circumstance along with a copy of your passport, then if they need more they will ask.

      As for the translation of the documents: you must do that for your marriage certifícate (just search online for something like “certifíed/official German translator for Russian/Romanian,” and when you fínd someone confírm they are certifíed to translate for the German government.

      For translating bank statements to show your income/savings- I’m not sure. Mine were in English and shown in dollars, and there wasn’t much writing, just numbers (and I highlighted all deposits), so they accepted that without a translation.

      Hope that helps and good luck

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      Reply
      1. John

        Dear Administrator.
        Thanks a lot for answer.
        You wrote above about the list of documents for getting Aufenthaltskarte.
        You mentioned “Identification Card” (last in the list). Whose is the “Identification Card” ? Spouse (non EU citizen) or of the spouse (EU citizen)?

      2. Administrator Post author

        Hello again, I meant my identification card (the applicant’s)- in my case it was a driver’s license from my home state, but I would guess any official government-issued picture identification would work.

  13. ewald

    Hi

    What an informative page. I am probably asking a question that has been answered before.

    Myself (South African) and my wife (British) are arriving in Germany on the 25th of April. I have applied for a tourist visa to enter (as spouse of a EU citizen). We have a place to stay with family at first and we have enough money saved up to last a few months when we find our own place (for rent, food, health insurance, etc). Until my wife finds a job and i can legally work.

    -Does she register within 2 weeks of our arrival alone (just for herself and only says she is married with presenting our marriage certificate)?

    -Then only once she is employed, before my visa expires and 3 months have passed do I apply for a residence permit based on the fact that she is employed and we have permanent residence?

    thank you so much.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Ewald,
      The “two weeks” rule for registering actually depends on what state you are in, but I believe that is the shortest period allowed by any state. Check with the state you’ll be living in because you might actually have enough time to get your marriage certifícate translated before you both have to register.

      However, she can register as single, and then go back later and change her status from single to married once you’ve got the marriage certifícate translated.

      And for the second point, you are correct. Once she (you both) are registered as being married at the rathaus you can apply for a residence permit based on that, and you will need to show that you can support yourself (or that she can support you both). Ideally this is before your three months pass, but you also have the option to extend your visa, I believe for up to a total of six months.

      Enjoy!

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      Reply
      1. ewald

        Thank you

        We are going to Munich, Hirschgarten to be exact.

        thank you for your swift response. We are very excited for our new future in Germany with our family.

      2. Administrator Post author

        I think in Bavaria you are supposed to register within two weeks of arriving. That sounds like fun, good luck not to drink too much beer 🙂

      3. carlajess

        Hi again

        I got my visitor visa for Germany today and it is only valid for 5 weeks as those were the dates of my flights.

        Will this be enough time to register our stay and apply for RC? Is it possible?

        Will I be able to stay longer than the visa on the basis that I am married to an EU citizen?

        Obviously we are going to try and get it all done as soon as we get there.

      4. Administrator Post author

        Hello again,
        It looks like, according to the following, as long as you have applied for your residence permit soon after entering Germany, then you can stay in Germany while this is processed even if it is longer than your current visa. Of course, I’m not positive on this, but this is what the law says:

        “(3) If a foreigner who is legally resident in the federal territory and does not possess a residence title applies for a residence title, his or her residence shall be deemed to be permitted up to the time of the decision by the foreigners authority.”

        http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p1088

        Back to Comment Directory

  14. John

    Dear Administrator,
    Could you write name company where you bought insurance for 35 per month?
    I tried find insurance equally to yours but failed.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello John, it was this company: http://www.imglobal.com/en/img-insurance/travel-medical-insurance/patriot-travel-medical-insurance.aspx

      And I should also mention: while this worked for the residence permit in my case, I’m not sure (and I actually doubt) it would work for a permanent residence permit after five years (for this you also have to show proof of medical insurance).

      Now as I try and find health insurance that will qualify me for the permanent residence permit, I’ve been told by one company that I need to buy health insurance retroactively (in other words, pay this German insurance company for the past three years) if I want to sign on.

      Anyway, I think I can get it sorted out fine, but the point is that if you plan on staying in Germany for a long time then you might as well look into getting health insurance from an German company and avoid potential future hassle. Cheers

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      Reply
  15. jian

    Hi All.

    Thanks for the contributions here.

    kindly review this please;-

    – A 34 years old german citizen.

    + with four kids for two africa man (from Ghana and Niger), two kids for each
    (oldest child 17yrs, youngest – 9yrs).

    Planing to marry-

    -Another 28years-old Ghanian who is currently on student visa, of course he has no academic/studies problem whatsoever.
    with 7 months remaining visa out of 2years.

    +1.) Please is there hindrances you might think of in getting resident if the marriage will be suceesful at all?

    +2.) will he need to wait till the initial 2years is due for renewal or he can process another permit now if possible?

    considering the financial situation ;……
    The german spouse is not working, on governmental welfare and not planing to work for now.

    +2.) Do you think applying for the three years german spouse resident permit will be successful based on the fianancial requirement?
    though the foreign spouse have student work permit (450 eur basis) and working.
    but they both live in different city because of his studies.

    +3) And if the condition still remain that the german spouse not working till after three years but the student is working (maybe still part-time cos of studies 450eur ).
    is it possible to naturalize( apply for German passports) fulfilling the language requirements and other tests?.

    Thanks for your response in anticipation

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Jian, according to Section 28 of the Residence Act (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p0382), it looks like as your spouse he can get a resident permit and money issues don’t matter. However, this doesn’t talk about getting married in Germany, only about a foreign spouse coming to join a German citizen.

      Regarding naturalization later, this page (http://www.bamf.de/EN/Einbuergerung/InDeutschland/indeutschland-node.html) says he must have independent means of securing a living (including for family members entitled to maintenance) without resorting to welfare payments and unemployment benefits.

      Hope this helps, and hopefully others have more information to add to this based on personal experience.

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      Reply
      1. Jian

        Really appreciate these pieces of informations.

        However I will like to ask :
        What is the next step after the marriage is registered in my spouse city, will I have to register again in my city where i studied?

        And I have 7months valid visa left on my student residents card which I can under normal circumstances Renew after it expires as a students.

        Is it possible/make sense to apply for another one as a German spouse or i should wait till the current expires?

        Finally ,will I apply at my own city or her city? How can I go about it?

      2. Administrator Post author

        Hello Jian, once you get married then you can change your registration at your local city hall (where you are registered now) from single to married. They might give you a hard time if you aren’t together, but maybe if you explain your situation they will understand. Once I went to register and my wife was working that day, and they let me register as “married” even though I was by myself.

        And I think once you are married, and registered as such in your city hall, then you can apply immediately for a residence permit based on marriage- you don’t need to wait until your student residence permit expires.

        Hope that also helps and good luck

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  16. John

    Dear Administrator,
    This link say that non EU citizen should submit – Proof of the right to free movement of the EU/EEA citizen
    …for non-employed persons: proof of health insurance and means of subsistence
    https://service.berlin.de/dienstleistung/324282/en/

    So in addition to my insurance I should also give insurance from my wife. Is not it ?
    Did authority demand from you health insurance of your spouse?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello John, I only submitted insurance for myself. My wife was not required to submit insurance for my application. I see from the link you sent that it does appear this may be a requirement for an EU/EEA citizen spouse.

      Perhaps in my case it was not required because I had a stable income. In fact, at the time I applied my EU-citizen spouse was a student (not working) and did not have German health insurance- only the basic emergency health insurance that all EU-citizens have throughout the EU.

      Hope this helps- I suppose you can apply with what you have and see what happens. Good luck

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      Reply
  17. Ver Bonifacio

    Hi,
    Thank you so much for posting this. As a non-EU, I find it very helpful. I hope you can help me with my situation. So, here goes.

    My boyfriend is German and I am Filipino currently living in Denmark as an aupair. My residence permit here in Denmark expires in July 2016. We are planning to get married around April or so. My first question is, where do you think is better for us to get married, in Germany or in Denmark?

    After the marriage, do I need to get a visa for Germany even though my residence permit in Denmark has not yet expired? And will I be eligible to apply for a residence permit in Germany once we are married?

    And lastly, once I move to Germany, I will not yet have any kind of work and I am only an aupair here in Denmark. Will that be a problem when it comes to applying for the residence permit? What do you recommend that I should do? My boyfriend is employed.

    Best regards,

    Verity

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Verity,
      First, I believe you can stay anywhere in the EU as long as your Danish residence permit is valid, however you will still need to register with your local city once you move to Germany (this is different from applying for a German residence permit).

      As for where to get married- one thing you may consider is that it looks like you don’t need to meet the German language requirement if your marriage took place outside of Germany. This is what the next link appears to say.

      That language requirement applies if your boyfriend has never lived in another EU country besides Germany. If not, then you may need to show you know basic German once you apply for a residence card based on marriage. More about that here: http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/EhepartnerFamilie/ehepartnerfamilie-node.html)

      For moving to Germany as the spouse of a German citizen: according to the law quoted below, it looks like you have the right to a German residence permit as the spouse of a German citizen. However I haven’t been able to find any information about a minimum income requirement or other related details.

      http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p0360

      Congratulations on your upcoming marriage and good luck

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      Reply
  18. John

    Dear Administrator
    You wrote: “A few days after I mailed all this in I received my federal tax identification number, and then a few weeks later (about three) had my final appointment at the Landratsamt.”

    Did you receive federal tax identification number by post (e-mail) to your home address or you to go somewhere?
    How do you think can I mail/submit my documents for Residence card (Aufenthaltskarte) at the Landratsamt in first days of my arrival? Or I must wait 3 month and only after 3 month submit documents?
    Can I leave Germany and go to Russia while my case will be considering (3 weeks?) in the Landratsamt ?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello John,
      I received the tax identification number by post at my home address, not email (however, you don’t need this information to apply for a residence permit).
      I believe once you have the registration from your municipality (anmeldebestätigung) then you can make an application for an residence card (aufenthaltskarte). You can do this as soon as you want, once you have your municipal registration.
      I think it’s also no problem to go anywhere else while your permit application is being processed. However once your aufenthaltskarte is approved you need to make an appointment to go and pick it up at the Landratsamt and do a few final procedures like get your fingerprints taken.

      Hope this helps

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      Reply
  19. Lang

    Hi Administrator,

    My husband who is British citizen and works in Germany. I am planning to go and join him in Germany. I am currently in the UK with my student visa ( non eu citizen ).

    I would like to know if i enter Germany ( I do not require Schengen visa to enter ) and wanted to apply residence permit, do i need to prove that i have a job offer in Germany beforehand in order to apply for residence permit? As i have no jobs at the moment so i cant prove about 700 euros montly salary but i do have £4000 savings in my UK bank so i wonder if that helps towards the application to meet the financial requirements.

    Thanks in advance.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Lang- if you apply for a residence permit based on being married to an EU citizen who is registered in Germany, you will need to show that you can support yourself (or have that support shared by someone else- in this case your husband). Your savings will certainly help, and I believe your husband’s income is also taken into consideration for the both of you.

      You should get your German tax number before the residence card is issued (I got my tax number after about a week, and the residence card after a month or two), and this number allows you to work which, if needed, can further help your application for a residence card.

      Anyway, I think if your husband has a full-time job then everything should be fine.

      Have fun

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      Reply
  20. Ace Zee

    Hi Administrator,

    Thank you for sharing your experience with us and i appreciate your effort and time in replying numerous questions.

    I am a Non-EU citizen. Currently, i have a 1 month Tourist Visa to enter Germany. My question is:

    Can my Gay partner Register me (Civil Register) in Germany after my arrival with a month Tourist Visa?

    Regards
    Ace

    Reply
  21. Engineer

    Hi,
    I’d like to move from Ireland to Germany. I am a German National and my wife a NON-EU with a 4 EUFAM Card.
    I’d like to register my wife in Germany so she can get the Aufenthaltskarte. I am still working in Ireland and my wife would stay in Germany.

    My thinking is:
    1. I register myself and wife at my moms address
    2. I go to the Ausländerbehörde and apply for the Aufenthaltskarte (for the wife)

    Can I show them my private insurance from Ireland(valid worldwide) and my Irish work contract? I earn far more than 700. Is it possible for my wife to stay in Germany while I am still in Ireland?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Engineer- I would say your idea sounds good. I think your Irish insurance should work, when I applied I also had foreign insurance from the USA and that worked.

      I just hope they don’t ask too many questions about how you can be registered in Germany and earning money for a company in Ireland. However I would guess that as long as you are registered here they can’t say no to the application.

      Unfortunately I can’t offer you any concrete information, and sometimes there are different rules for German citizens. You could get some idea of these rules by going through the Residence Act (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/index.html).

      Good luck

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      Reply
  22. Ace Zee

    Thanks for your quick reply,

    I and my partner is thinking of getting our registration done in Denmark due to long time delay (Process) of Germany Registry.

    I read on a blog that after getting the civil partnership done in Denmark, the Municipality of my Partner might not agree to grant my residence card and i will be ask to go back to my country of current residence or home country to apply for reunification visa.

    Do you have any idea about this? Also, in what city/municipality did you get your residence card done?

    Regards
    Ace.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello again Ace, I haven’t heard about this, but I haven’t read much about the subject either.

      Wikipedia mentions that a new bill was approved in October 2015 which made the rights of same-sex partnerships more clear as being equal to married persons. Perhaps what you read was posted before this ruling, and remedied by it (hopefully anyway):(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recognition_of_same-sex_unions_in_Germany#Third_Merkel_government_.282013.E2.80.93present.29).

      All I can find about inequality between civil partnerships and marriage relates to the adoption of children and taxes. Hopefully that means you won’t have any trouble getting a residence card as a non-EU citizen in a partnership with a German.

      I got my residence card from the Landratsamt in Heidelberg.

      Best of luck

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      Reply
  23. Peter

    Hello Administrator.

    Do you think is possible for a citizen of another EU member state to come and get marriage to an asylum seeker in Germany here tnx???

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Peter,

      I haven’t researched this issue, but I would think that is possible. Aside from the issue of same-sex marriages, I don’t know of any laws prohibiting marriage between two people.

      Congratulations

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      Reply
    2. Sheraz Qadir

      Yess. Its Possible And Many Asylum Seekers Married With Eu Girls In Germany, And They Get Aufenthalt For Five Years

      Reply
  24. Soni

    Can an illegal woman in germany and a british man (not resident in germany) get married in germany and make spouse visa application in germany or uk, please what is required

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Soni,
      The answer to your question starts with knowing what is required to get married in Germany, and that I am not sure of because I’ve never been married in Germany.

      However, I believe if you get married anywhere to an EU citizen then you can apply to stay in any EU country, assuming you meet the financial and health insurance requirements. For the UK I believe if you’re married to a UK citizen then you automatically get health insurance through the NHS (however in this case the UK citizen would need to make a certain amount of income before you would be allowed to travel to the UK as a non-EU spouse).

      From my experience in Sweden and Germany, it seems it is quite easy for an EU citizen to move to another EU country (not their native EU country- that is more difficult) and bring their non-EU spouse with them.

      So it sounds like your first order of business would be to get married somewhere. I’m not sure how your legal status would affect any future applications either.

      Best of luck

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      Reply
  25. Winfred Kerford

    My name is Winfred and me and my wife who is a German Citizen got married in California on 11-20-2015 and we moved back to Weimar, Germany. They gave me temporary Resident Visa for 90 days. In June I go back to the Government office and have to show a certificate for A1 German basic language. I have a medical condition mentally that was caused by a car accident I was in, in 1986 which hinder me from learning and staying focus to learn. I recently sent off for my medical records from my doctor in California. Is there a Hardship case that will Exempt me and allow me to get My Resident permit. If so what should we do and what German Government do I present these medical records to? I have until June 6. Of this year. Please help with the correct information and answers.
    Thank You. Mr Winfred Kerford.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Mr. Winfred Kerford- congratulations on your recent marriage.

      On the German government page from BAMF it says, “proof of linguistic ability is not required if … the efforts required by the foreign spouse in order to acquire basic German skills whilst abroad are not feasible, cannot be reasonably expected or do not prove successful within a period of one year.” (http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/EhepartnerFamilie/ehepartnerfamilie-node.html).

      It sounds like it is possible to get a sort of hardship deferment in your case, especially if you have medical records that say you have difficulty learning a language. I would recommend notifying the Landratsamt or whichever agency wrote to you that you must take the language class.

      Feel free to post back on what you find, and best of luck.

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  26. sonam

    my name is sonam i have austrian student visa i am recently married to german citizen and we are currently living in germany i want to ask now i have to apply for visa how can i do that do we have to go directly to visa office in germany or how what i need to prove because he has his own business .. can you please guide me..i have visa until 20 of may ..please guide us we are worried now because we don’t know how to do.
    thank you

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Sonam,

      Congratulations on your marriage. I believe what you need to do is register yourself as married at your local rathaus, then make an application for a residence card through your Landratsamt office. Has your husband ever registered as living in another EU country? If not then you will probably need to show that you can speak and understand basic German (A1) eventually in the future.

      Luckily in your case (perhaps you also speak German if you lived in Austria?) your husband can do the speaking at all the state agencies, and confirm that you are following the right procedures.

      Good luck!

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      Reply
  27. sonam

    hello sorry for the inconvenience again i have question to ask that which and what kind of form i need to fill and which documents i need and my partner to take with to visa office can you tell me in details.
    thank you

    Reply
  28. Anubhav Bisht

    Hi Admin,

    I am in similar situation myself. I am an Indian national married to German Citizen and we been living in UK for 6 months. Now we want to move to Germany. I can get visa without showing language proficiency. Now we will be living with her family. i have following questions:

    a) Do we need a letter from her father that we are living in his house in order to register with municipal corporation or any other proof will be required.
    b) Do i need to give any language test while i make my RC Application.
    c) Will they consider savings from UK Bank or can i show savings from my spouse bank account as well.
    d) What is processing time for this.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Anubhav Bisht,

      a) Yes, I believe you will need a letter from her father stating that you live there, or a rental contract of some kind. They will tell you at the rathaus if you need anything else on this subject.

      b) If your wife is registered as living in the UK (meaning that she also registered in Germany as living abroad – or if she has ever registered as living in another EU country before) then I believe you do not need to meet any German language requirements or show any language tests for your initial 5-year residence permit.

      c) Yes, I believe they will consider savings from all banks, from both of you (for me they considered an American bank, and I didn’t translate my bank statement summary, just highlighted the savings).

      d) Registering at the rathaus was instantaneous, and then I sent in my documents to the landratsamt. After about a week I got my tax number, then after a month or two I got the residence card.

      Good luck, it sounds like your case will be fine.

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      Reply
  29. Klara Kadau

    Hello,

    I’m a German citizen who got married to a non EU citicen (an Australian) in Australia and now we want to apply for permanent residency for him. I happen to have lived abroad in England and Switzerland for 4 months each during my studies. How and to whom do I have to prove that in order for my husband not to need a German language certificate ?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Klara Kadau,

      Sorry but I don’t know the answer to your question because I managed to escape this requirement. Hopefully someone else reading will have a better answer for you.

      As I understand (from BAMF’s website: http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/EhepartnerFamilie/ehepartnerfamilie-node.html) the policy is, “If a foreign national moves to Germany to join a German spouse, proof of linguistic ability is not required if the German national has previously exercised his/her right of freedom of movement within Europe”

      Good luck

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      Reply
  30. Ash

    Hello,

    I have got my residence permit recently based on marriage with EU citizen. i had put my documents in to the local immigration office and got everything approved less than a month. I have now got a letter from my local immigration office and stated that because my eAT card is in production in Berlin so hence issuing a letter to confirm that i am now legal in the country and been given permission to work. I was originally been given for 5 years to stay but the validity of my passport has only 4 years left so hence my eAT will only valid for 4 years instead, the same day my passport expires.

    What puzzles me was that, unlike you and most of the researches that i did online, i haven’t been asked to provide any health insurance nor did i fill in any application to stay hence i did not pay 60euros application fee or purchase any insurances. I was first in about a month ago and explained our situation to them and asked what documents do we need. But we have brought most documents with us at the time anyway, eg bank statements, marriage certiciate, work contract, certificate of residence etc so we gave them all we have. They did not ask for more so i thought they don’t require any insurances. All the doucments provided are in English. They are happy with English and did not get asked to get them translated to German. And they do not require me to submit in my passport to them as well. All they asked for at the time was a copy of my passport and that’s it, i keep hold of my passport at all time. After everything is submitted on the first day, i was issued a temporary residence permit for a month. So just before it expired, i went in again and check what should i do because my permit expires in a few days as i have not heard anything and that is when they told me everything is approved and was asked to provide one biometric photo and they issued me a letter on the spot and said i am now got my resident permit and took my fingerprints, height and paid 28.80 euros for the issuance of the eAT card.

    Just thought i would share my one-month journey for obtaining residence permit in Germany through marriage to EU citizen.

    Reply
    1. John

      Dear Ash
      You are lucky!
      I can not get Residence permit (Aufenthaltskarte) during 2 months. I submitted my documents (only in German) to Auslanderbehorde in Thuringia in March. The officials do not answer nor to my e-mails nor my letters by post.

      Reply
      1. Ash

        Hi John,

        I have submitted my documents in on April and got the permission in writing in May (less than a month). The officials that i was dealing with are very friendly to us and answered all our queries as much as they can. But you will have to wait until the german foreign affairs has reviewed and approved your case before the officials can comment on your case. Like i said before, none of the documents we submitted were in German as they have no problems with English (UK) documents that we have submitted.

        I have yet to receive my Aufenthaltskarte eAT because it is in production in Berlin, hence the local officials has issued me a letter to confirm my stay and work permission in Germany until my Aufenthaltskarte eAT is ready for collection. I have also been told by the officials that at the meantime, the letter issued by them is enough to prove my stay and work permission in Germany until my eAT card is issued. Do you mind if i ask your nationality and your spouse’s nationality please? I dont see why they are holding your application that long especially i can get mine within a month.

        Hope this helps.

  31. John

    Dear All
    If I Registered my name and address with my local municipality (Einwohnermeldeamt) in land of Thuringia could I apply for Residence Card (Aufenthaltskarte) in BERLIN?

    As I see in Berlin most friendly land/city than other cities of Germany which issue Residence Card (Aufenthaltskarte). I am waiting during 2 months Residence Card (Aufenthaltskarte) in little town in Thuringia of Germany. The officials of the town or are dilettantes or they do not want to issue to me Residence Card (Aufenthaltskarte). They refuse answer by e-mails.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello John- sounds frustrating. Did you email your questions in German? I can imagine they wouldn’t respond if they weren’t in German. Otherwise I would be surprised/disheartened if they completely ignored you.

      I believe you can’t just apply anywhere; that you must apply at the Landratsamt for your state (Thuringia in your case).

      Good luck and hopefully you get a response soon.

      Back to Comment Directory

      Reply
      1. John

        Hello Administrator,
        I went to Auslanderbehorde. Official said that I will get Aufenthaltskarte but before that I get just some kind of visa for 6 month with right of work in Germany. As soon I get job contract then I will get Aufenthaltskarte for 5 years.
        Is it a legal? Must I get Aufenthaltskarte at once without 6 months visa?
        My wife is EU citizen. I am not EU citizen. We submited to Auslanderbehorde documents according “3. § 2 Abs. 2 Nr. 5 einen Nachweis über ausreichenden Krankenversicherungsschutz und ausreichende Existenzmittel” http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/freiz_gg_eu_2004/__5a.html

      2. Administrator Post author

        Hmm, that is different from what happened to me. It sounds like we are in the same situation, and for me I got the aufenthaltskarte valid for five years a few weeks after my work authorization and tax number came (perhaps this is the document you’re referring to that allows you to work).

        For me I was already self-employed so perhaps I avoided this requirement to find a job before I could get the aufenthaltskarte.

        However regardless of this, according to the German Residence Act, if you are a non-EU citizen married to an EU citizen then you have the right to a residence card that entitles you to work.

        This is the section that says you have the right of residence and employment: http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p0351

        It says you can have a residence permit to join a spouse legally living in Germany, and that you have the right to work, “residence titles … shall entitle their holders to pursue an economic activity.”

        It provides for a few exceptions to this, the main one seems to be if you or your spouse is receiving social benefits. If neither of you are though, then I don’t know why they would only give you temporary paperwork and say you need to find a job first before you can get your five-year residence permit.

        If it seems that you both meet all the requirements for the subsequent immigration of the spouse of an EU citizen, then I would say try asking (writing) the Auslanderbehorde to see why they didn’t grant you the five-year residence permit. You could also try speaking with a lawyer, or there are also free services like Caritas that can help you answer immigration questions (http://www.caritas-germany.org/).

        Good luck and hope you get it sorted out right.

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  32. J

    My husband is a Romanian and working and living in Germany. Is he need to apply for a residence permit in Germany? Because residence permit is requirements for getting visa(reunification) .

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Joan- I don’t believe he needs a residence permit because he is from an EU country. If you’re from a non-EU country then I believe you need a residence permit for family reunification.

      Hello Joan,

      Yes, Germany’s Residence Act (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p0415) says you can bring your children if they are minors and you have a German residence permit.

      Here is the page from BAMF about how you can do this: http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/Arbeiten/Familiennachzug/familiennachzug-node.html

      Basically it says you have to have a large enough house/apartment and you must have secure income (and I assume they also consider your husband’s income as well).

      Hope this helps

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      Reply
  33. Showbaba

    Hello Sir, Please i need your enlightment on this, Im a Nigerian living on Asyl benefits in Germany , then i had a baby with Italian woman,when i applied for my Resident permit the office told me to look for a job but i am not allowed to work with my current permit …Please what can i do ?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Showbaba,

      Are you married with the Italian woman? If not, then I don’t believe you can apply for a residence permit in Germany based on being married to an EU citizen (and if you are married then she would need to register her residence in Germany).

      Next it depends on where your baby was born, and if you have any custody of the child. Look at the law pertaining to this (Section 33, 34, and 36): http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p0422

      My question for you is, what is your ultimate goal here? Custody of your child? A residence permit based on marriage or a common law partnership? Something else?

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      Reply
  34. sonam ikram

    hello sir

    i have question how many years or after how long you can apply or have german passport what is the requirements and which things important for a person to must have.
    i will wait for your answer
    thank you

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Sonam Ikram,

      I believe you must become a German citizen and then you can apply for a passport. I believe it takes something like seven years and you must have acceptable health insurance as well as paid into the pension and long-term-care system for at least five years. I believe in most cases you must also renounce your previous citizenship, prove you can speak B1 German (something around this level), and pass a test about knowledge of German civics.

      You can find more information here:
      http://www.bamf.de/EN/Einbuergerung/einbuergerung-node.html

      Best of luck

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      Reply
  35. Kelvin

    Hello Admin, my name is kelvin, i am a student and from a non eu country. Please i have a child with a german woman i would like to know how i can change my student visa to full working permit. Secondly how do i go about getting my five years resident permit since i’m a father of a german kid. My gf is working and earning about €2000 a month. What financial reqzuirements do i need. If i change from a student permit, can i still study? I still have about 12 months left on my student permit. Thanks

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Greetings Kelvin,

      I don’t believe you can get a residence permit based on the fact that your child is German (if you are a non-EU citizen and the mother is a German citizen, see: http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p0440)

      However if you get married or a civic partnership then you can apply for a residence permit based on this. If you choose this route then you need to meet the requirements detailed on this page.

      You may also be able to qualify through a job or additional methods, though I’m not sure about the details on this. (check the residence act: http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/index.html)

      I believe you can always study in Germany no matter what your status is.

      Best wishes for you

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      Reply
  36. Matt

    Hi im a trinidadian citizen just fot married in denmark to a german citizen is it possible for me to apply for residence permit inside german? (Note be both live outside germany before this move)

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Greetings Matt,

      Congratulations on your wedding. Yes, I believe you can apply for a residence permit once you are both registered as living in Germany. Assuming your spouse was registered as living in Denmark I also believe you don’t need to meet the German language requirement.

      Enjoy

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      Reply
  37. zak

    Hello
    My name is Zak im non-Eu citizen and im willing to marry my gril friend from germany , im in germany now with a Frensh tourist visa ,1) so my question can we get married even if i have a frensh tourist visa , 2)and is it ok if im a student with a Master degree and she have the suffisant income to support us both untill i found a job , 3) if my tourist visa have ended and i did not get yet my RC can i stay n germany or i must comeback to renew my tourist visa. 4) whats the minimum income that she must have each month to support us both .

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Zak,

      1) I’m not sure about the laws Germany has for getting married within the country, but I would think your status as a tourist would not interfere with getting married in Germany.

      2) Yes, I believe as long as at least one of you can meet the income requirement for two people then it should be fine.

      3) According to the Resident Act chapter Section 81 part 3, “If a foreigner who is legally resident in the federal territory [Germany] and does not possess a residence title applies for a residence title, his or her residence shall be deemed to be permitted up to the time of the decision by the foreigners authority.” (https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p1088)

      4) I believe the minimum income for two is something like 1000 euros per month- honesty I’m not sure what it is now, but somewhere around there (maybe plus or minus 100 euros). When I applied my wife and I together had savings of around 1,500 euros and a combined income of around 1,000 euros per month.

      Hope this helps and enjoy

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      Reply
  38. Tony Fulton

    Hello. Thanks for your amazing help above in all these matters. I do hope I’m not asking a question that has already been asked… I will marry my German girlfriend – I’m a UK citizen (and yes I’m ashamed of my country today, 24 June). We travel a lot in Europe. Given that UK will no longer be in the E.U., are there any benefits to getting married in Germany instead of UK? Should we try to do that? Or will it not matter? I’m looking ahead, thinking I will not want to live in UK. We are currently living elsewhere in Europe but may want to live in Germany one day. many thanks.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Tony Fulton,

      Yes, quite amazing to see the “out” vote prevail. As of now of course we just have to wait and see.

      I think as far as marriage goes, where you actually get married isn’t so important. You could register a marriage that took place in Bangladesh in Germany, and I believe that marriage would be just as valid as a marriage that took place in the UK or France.

      We will see what happens

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      Reply
      1. Tony Fulton

        Ok,many thanks for the reply. I guess I’m looking ahead and wondering what if any precautions we can take, if there are any benefits to my girlfriend being German, and what if anything we should do now rather than later? If you have any advice I’d be most grateful.

  39. Rony rex

    Hi I am an Non EU resident of German Citizen my German spouse is registered Married in Germany
    If I will go with family visit visa how how long time it will take for my aufenthalt card N please write me the all process for this.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Rony Rex, if you’re married to your German spouse then you can apply for a residence card once you’ve legally arrived in Germany. For me it took a month or two to get the aufenthaltskarte. You can remain in Germany while your application is being processed. To be guided I would say just follow the steps detailed on this webpage.

      Hope this helps

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      Reply
  40. Douglas Hackney

    Thank you for this detailed post and your many replies to the comments and questions.

    RE: I got my residence card without needing to fulfill any language requirement.

    How were you able to do this?

    Were you already fluent or had enough German language skills that you passed via the interview?

    RE: U.S. exemption

    The news story you linked to states this exemption for U.S. citizens: “In addition, citizens of Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea and the United States also don’t have to demonstrate German-language skills.”

    [ I tried to include the link to the story but it would not accept the comment with the link]

    However, I have not seen that exemption for U.S. citizens anywhere on the German government sites.

    Thanks,
    Doug

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Douglas Hackney,

      Right now I believe the language requirement is as stated in the body of the website, and this can be confirmed here: http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/EhepartnerFamilie/ehepartnerfamilie-node.html

      I was able to avoid the language requirement because my EU spouse is not German.

      I also can’t find anything about the list of exempted countries linked to in that article (http://www.dw.com/en/european-court-overturns-law-requiring-german-language-skills-for-spouse-visas/a-17772143) anywhere in the German Residence Act (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/index.html). It sounds like it’s worth confirming the exemption with BAMF.

      Good luck,

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      Reply
      1. Douglas Hackney

        Thank you for the follow up, research and reply.

        I was able to find a reference to the exemption for U.S. citizens here:

        http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/Arbeiten/Familiennachzug/familiennachzug-node.html

        * * * * *
        Does my family have to speak German?

        As a rule, spouses have to have a basic knowledge of German to be issued with a residence permit. There are however a number of exceptions to this principle. Your spouse does not need to know any German to obtain a residence permit if

        * you yourself have an EU Blue Card,
        * you yourself work in Germany as a highly-qualified person, a researcher or self-employed person and were already married when you moved to Germany,
        * it is obvious that there is little need for integration assistance (for instance as a rule if your partner is a graduate),
        * you are a national of Australia, Israel, Japan, Canada, the Republic of Korea, New Zeeland or the United States of America.

        * * * * *

        My wife has dual passports, U.S. and Germany.

        In this case, in your opinion, do you think I would qualify for the language skills exemption?

        Thanks,
        Doug

      2. Administrator Post author

        Hello Doug,
        I’m still not absolutely positive you would qualify for the language skills exemption if you are American (I’m assuming you are) based on the link you sent.

        For immigration purposes, for you to qualify to live in Germany then your wife would invoke her status as a German citizen whom you are married. The link you quoted above (http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/Arbeiten/Familiennachzug/familiennachzug-node.html) is referring to third country nationals, ie non-German citizens who have legal residency in Germany.

        However, the other BAMF link that talks about subsequent entry of spouses for German citizens (http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/EhepartnerFamilie/ehepartnerfamilie-node.html) says that you, as the spouse of the German citizen, can be exempt from the language requirement if your German spouse has taken advantage of their freedom of movement “within Europe.” Perhaps if your German spouse has also exercised freedom of movement outside of Europe for an extensive time this would also be considered? That is a question for BAMF.

        The only other hope I can offer is that original Deutsche Welle article that says the German language requirement policy is against EU laws (http://www.dw.de/european-court-overturns-law-requiring-german-language-skills-for-spouse-visas/a-17772143). However how this would practically play out for you is another question for BAMF.

        I would say to be safe, have your spouse (assuming she speaks German) call/email BAMF and clarify whether or not you would qualify for the language requirement.

        Feel free to post back here on anything you find. Hopefully it works out

        Back to Comment Directory

  41. M. Nasery

    Hi,

    I would appreciate if anyone can help regarding the following issue.

    I’m a none-Eu citizen married to a citizen of EU ( Bulgaria). our marriage was done outside of Germany in my county and I have the official marriage certificate translated into English. We are both registered with the local authorities in Berlin since some months ago and now I am applying for a resident card as none-EU family member. The thing is Auslanderbehorde has asked us of a document called ” Nachweis Ehe nach deutschem Recht”, which according to google translator means proof of marriage according to German law. Any idea where and how can I get this? I also went trough the Standesamt I website and couldn’t find such a document 😦

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello M. Nasery,

      That is puzzling. I haven’t heard of such a thing happening, and I can’t find that term “nachweis…” in the German version of the residence act either (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/aufenthg_2004/BJNR195010004.html).

      I have heard of the government requesting proof that you are not married to multiple people (I think you can obtain this from your home country), especially in cases of people who are divorced and have re-married.

      Here is something mentioned on the website Justlanded (https://www.justlanded.com/deutsch/Deutschland/Artikel/Visa-Papiere/Ehefragen) Part 1, section a (translated in Google):

      “a) General conditions of marriage
      The marriage must be allowed in principle under the law of both partners. Just as a German partner or a German partner must demonstrate his / her capacity to marry under German law, also has a foreign partner or a foreign partner to meet the requirements for marriage under the law of the home country. These include the age of majority or an exemption from the requirement of marriageable age in individuals between 16 and 18 years. Furthermore, no impediments to marriage may preclude. Such impediments may result from kinship, an adoptive relationship or of an existing marriage.”

      So from this it looks like Auslanderbehorde wants to you get something from your home country government saying you are legally married there (meaning, when you got married you were old enough to do so, and that you are not related to your spouse by blood, and that if you are divorced and re-married, that you did this legally).

      Hope this helps. Feel free to write back with what you find out.

      Best of luck

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      Reply
  42. clarakings

    Hallo,
    I’m an EU citizen married to an Australian since three year. Four months ago we moved to germany, where I’m doing an Ausbildung. My husband got his Aufenthalt permit for the next 5 years. But he got a study place at a good university in another city a couple of hours away. Are we allowed to not live together? We would be spending all weekend and holidays togethers, but because of our studies we cannot live together on the week. How will the work? Does he need to register at the burgeramt? And if so will they let him stay with the Aufenthalt permit as we would then be registered in two different places?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Clarakings,

      Congratulations, it sounds like you have been successful with the most complicated parts. I don’t think it would cause any issue if you have separate addresses. I also don’t think the issue would come up until he needs to renew his aufenthaltskarte after five years- and even if something did come up (however unlikely it is) I think a simple explanation from you would be all that was needed (maybe after five years you will be living at the same address again anyway).

      I’m not sure if being registered at two addresses is possible. Separately, I’m not even sure if your husband would need to register with the burgeramt where his university is- especially if he is traveling to visit you each weekend. My wife is registered as living in a city in Bayern but she is still able to get a student card from a university in Baden-Wurttemberg.

      Hopefully this helps, but to know for certain I can only suggest asking at the Landratsamt.

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      Reply
  43. Jons

    Yes, he can register two addresses,

    However , he will be asked to pay zwiewohnung steuer , by the second city.

    But showing proof of students/Beruf and civil union certs will exempt him from it!
    Of course you can be married in a city and work in another city,
    Hope this helps,

    Ps- I don’t think there is need to register at the second burgerburo anyway, but it’s safe again in case of any benefits or other unforeseen circumstances that may come up!

    Reply
    1. Jons

      In addition, the first address will be his main address where his files and documents will always remain!

      So if he needs to talk to the foreign office, he must always come back home, or you do it for him.

      Reply
  44. Steven

    I’m a US Citizen engaged to a German citizen. I’m visiting Germany the first week of August of this year to meet her family. I will be there for 7 weeks and returning to the US at the end of September. She will be flying to the US in October and we want to get married while she’s in the US and we would like to fly back to Germany together after we’re married. I would be moving into her place in Germany. This is the plan, but I know legally there are multiple things that need to be done. Please help us to make this happen.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Steven,

      Congratulations on your upcoming marriage. Your situation sounds pretty straightforward.

      As long as your combined incomes are around something like 1000 euros per month (or if she is receiving social benefits, your income should be around something like 800 euros per month), then I think your biggest challenge will be translating your US marriage certificate into German with an official translator (just do a search for German government-approved translators)- and that’s not difficult.

      Once you’ve got that marriage certificate translated you just need to follow the steps: register as married at your local rathaus, then apply for a residence permit (this includes the right to work) with your Landratsamt.

      The process may be slightly different from the one detailed above because you are marrying a German citizen (in my case I was married an EU citizen), but your spouse should be able to get all the details from the government authorities when you’re applying.

      Good luck and have fun

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      Reply
  45. Steven

    Thank you for this information, I shared it with my fiancé and she said this looks pretty simple. And thank you for the congratulations on out marriage. I pray everything works out 🙂

    Reply
    1. Drew Robinson

      Hi Steven,
      I’m in the exact situation as you currently. I was wondering if you were able to move over successfully. Any lessons learned, anything that I can think off?

      Reply
  46. Ebony

    Hello Admin,

    I got married (non-eu) in Denmark with my German Spouse and today we registered the marriage certificate at the Rathaus today. All is OK from there and we are back home. I came into the country with Tourist visa which will last still September 2016.

    What next should i do now?
    And at what point would i have to show A1 German Certificate?

    Regards
    Ebony

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Ebony,

      Congratulations on your marriage. As long as you apply for your residence permit soon before your tourist visa expires you should be fine, even if it is processed past your visa expiration (Section 81 part 3 or the Residence Act http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p1088)

      Next I believe you need to apply for the residence permit at the Landratsamt. This should take a few weeks to process and I suspect it is during this time that you will need to show your German language certificate. Maybe don’t bring it up if they don’t ask- perhaps they might forget? 🙂

      Actually if your German spouse unregistered him/herself from living in Germany and registered him/herself as living in Denmark (or any other EU country) then I believe you don’t need to meet the language requirement, as your spouse has taken advantage of his/her right of free movement. http://www.bamf.de/EN/Migration/EhepartnerFamilie/ehepartnerfamilie-node.html

      Good luck

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      Reply
  47. Ebony

    Less i forget, after my registration i did not receive official anmeldebestätigung, or certificate of registration.

    Will the anmeldebestätigung, or certificate of registration be send to the address i give during my registration?

    Regards.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      I’ve registered in three different cities and I think maybe once (sorry, it was a few years ago) the official registration came in the mail. If it doesn’t come in a few days then I would go ask/call about it. You need to have a copy of it to submit when you apply for a residence permit with the Landratsamt. You and your spouse registered together at the same time, correct?

      Also I should mention- I’m telling you the process how I did it as a non-EU married to a non-German EU. Your procedure might be different considering you’re married to a German citizen.

      Good luck

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      Reply
  48. sidhu

    hello sir..i am asylum seeker in germany..i was marrid with Romanish girel in Austria nd aftr marrige i will come back in Germany..now my wife living in germany nd working here…is that possible i got a residency card nd how ??

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      You are still married to someone from Romania?

      If yes then I think you can qualify for a residence permit based on being married to an EU citizen who has registered her right to live in Germany, assuming you meet the requirements for that listed on this page (just follow the process detailed here too).

      I’m not sure how your status as an asylum seeker will interfere with this application, if it does at all. I suspect you may have to somehow cancel your asylum application to apply for a residence permit based on marriage. I am really guessing on this though, and recommend you speak with someone in BAMF or at the your local Landratsamt to figure out what exactly you can do.

      Feel free to post back on what you discover because you are not the first person to ask this question, and it would be good to have a confirmed answer on what to do.

      Hopefully this helps and good luck

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      Reply
  49. Carlos

    Hi There Administrator, saviour and helper of those of us in need.

    I have a question indeed:
    I am a Spanish dual citizen (I was born in Latin America from a Spanish descended family and hold dual citizenship) but my wife is from a Non-Eu country (yes, a Latin American country). We have not applied yet family reunion since I just got my citizenship, but since Spain has one of the highest ratings of unemployment, and since I have some friends in south west Germany, we are seriosly thinking about moving there. I have around 9000 euro in savings and so on. My questions are:

    1.-Will there be any problem if I move to Germany and do all the processing?
    2.-is my second citizenship(besides Spanish) a problem for Germany or I will have no problems?
    3.-How can I show that I have enough money to the embassy in Latin America if I want to do family reunion in Germany with my wife?

    Thank you for your time and your help.

    Sincerely

    Carlos

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Carlos,

      When you register yourself in Germany at the rathaus I think if you just show your Spanish passport then it should be fine. I’m not sure how dual citizenship is viewed in Germany, but the only time my wife (EU citizen) had any interaction with the German government was when we registered as being married at the rathaus upon arriving in Germany, and at this time she showed her passport and that was it. It is your wife who will be having to fill out all the forms for a residence permit.

      Because you are a Spanish (EU) citizen you can move to Germany whenever you want along with your non-EU wife, and you are right to be concerned about meeting the money requirement.

      I can tell you that when I (non-EU citizen) moved to Germany I had about 2,500 euros in savings and could show that I had been earning about 1,000 euros per month (I was a freelancer and thus taking my job with me to Germany) for the last five months. At the time my wife was a student (because we registered as married the German government considers both our income combined) and that income and savings was enough for a five-year residence permit.

      The way I showed this was by printing off my bank statements and highlighting the numbers that showed monthly income in and savings. I was surprised that I didn’t need to have those bank statements translated- they were in English.

      Best of luck and enjoy Germany

      Back to Comment Directory

      Reply
  50. Ebony

    Thanks Admin,

    You are right, since my spouse is a German, i was asked to go through German Embassy in my country or any country i have residence permit.

    I will be going to German Embassy in Skopje since i have residence from there.

    Thanks for your reply.

    Reply
  51. Guenter

    I am a German citizen, living since 20 years in the Philippines, being married here for 17 years, and we decided to move to Germany. There are no visa appointments available for a family reunion visa since almost a year, and none in the near future, but there are many schengen visa appointments available. Can I get a schengen visa for my wife, travel with her to Germany, and convert it there to a residence visa anyhow? My sister would try to rent an apartment for us in advance, so we could register immediately with that address once we arrive in Germany. We are planning to sell our house here in the Philippines and purchase a new house in Germany. We are both above 50 years of age, and I do freelance worg/self employed.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Guenter,

      I can’t tell you a definite answer based on my own experience, but you can find relevant information in the Residence Act (I think the answer to your question is yes, she can enter on a tourist visa and then apply for a residence permit based on your marriage once you both arrive in Germany):

      Section 6: Visa (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p0071)

      Section 81: Application for the residence title (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p1088)

      I think you can find the best answer to your question by calling the landratsamt where your wife would be applying and asking your question.

      Good luck

      Back to Comment Directory

      Reply
  52. John

    Dear Administrator.
    I have got Aufenthaltskarte but only for 6 month. Auslanderbehorde said that if I get a job contract then Auslanderbehorde will give me Aufenthaltskarte for 5 years. Do you think is it legally? What is happen if I can not get job-contract to the end of 6 month ?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello John,

      I haven’t heard of someone in your situation before. I’m not sure about the legality, but you can find what is written in law about the residence card in the Residence Act (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/index.html).

      I’m not sure what will happen if you don’t find a job. Feel free to post back with information about whatever happens in your case, and best of luck finding a job (you have relatively good chances in Germany).

      Back to Comment Directory

      Reply
  53. jodavid83

    Hello,
    Great post!
    You mention that when tou applied for a residence card, ypu showed that you was self employed…so to apply for RC you must have a job first?… The EU or the non-EU? We have registered and recieved our tax numbers and now the non-EU may have a potential job offer..can he work?
    Thankyou

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Jodavid83,

      If you have your tax numbers then I think you can work. I believe to apply for a residence card (as a non-EU married to an EU who is not German) you must show that you can support yourself, which means savings, a job, pension, and/or support from a family member/spouse.

      Good luck

      Back to Comment Directory

      Reply
  54. Jayd

    Hello moderator.

    I am a student from Camaroun studying my masters. Presently, my normal 2 years visa will expire by end of December 2016.

    I met a lady she is Kenyian, she has a son with a German citizen and that gave her a stay in Germany. Though the normal visa for child birth is 3 years buy her’s is one year to expire by January 2017 due to her passport will expire 2016 December. Definitely she will renew to get her extra 2years.

    But presently, she is not working as she is under social and living in social apartment. But for me l do work, sometimes full time and part time.

    Please, do you think if we get married that l will be given a marriage residence permit considering she has not worked yet in Germany and she is just one year old and got her stay visa due to child birth with a German.

    Please, l need an advice before going further to the marriage.

    But sure, l know once we are married, she won’t be under social again which as a family am to take responsibility and work. (This is not a problem for me)

    But is it wise t go ahead with the marriage due to the lady has not work up to six months as somebody advised . But sure now she is doing her German classes A1 and will start work once she reach A2 to B1

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Jayd,

      I see what you are asking: if you get married to her then will you get a residence permit for Germany.

      Perhaps you can find your answer in the Residence Act (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/index.html).

      It sounds like Section 30
      
Subsequent Immigration of Spouses (http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_aufenthg/englisch_aufenthg.html#p0382) is particularly relevant for you (“foreigner” refers to her, and “spouse” refers to you.)

      There are several ways her residence permit can qualify you for a residence permit, so you must read through that section (and the corresponding referenced sections) to see which case could apply to you.

      I am just an amateur reading the law, but it looks like you might be able to qualify based on marriage.

      Best of luck

      Back to Comment Directory

      Reply
  55. Anonymous

    hello there,
    i want to request for asylum in spain or maybe not…i have a german girlfriend and we really want to get married.i was sent back to spain because its the first EU country i came in,but i never seekrd for asylum…the question is this;
    is it possible to marry outside Germany and then present them the marriage certificate in germany?many thanks

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      Dear Anonymous!

      Don’t seek for asylum because if you seek Asylum now you have willing hand over your self to be imprison and you can not marry your girl any more until your asylum as been approved by the government and of which you are not sure if it will be approve even in 10 years to come.

      1. Did you enter Spain with visa and did you over stayed your visa?
      2. Or you enter Spain without visa (Through Sea)?

      If your answer is 2, means right now, you are undocumented migrant, no record of you that you enter Spain and no record that you are living in Spain.

      But if your answer is 1, means you will be fine at airport when checking out or be ban for entering EU for some period of time. It will take a while before you will be granted visa to enter EU zone again.

      But if your answer is 2 my advice for you is that since you have not document your self has an Asylum seeker, it better for you to return back home and re-arrange your self by getting Tourist visa then get all necessary documents for Marriage then contact Marriage registry in Denmark and after they cross check your documents and see all documents are ok, you will be giving appointment date then you and your girl can go and get married there and you can join her by applying for Family reunion visa from Germany embassy which is very easy to secure.

      Reply
  56. Jian

    hi all,

    i really have a question regarding the recent changes in the registration Act (meldegesetz i think.)

    i am a foreign students and have been living alone before i met my partner in another city
    (about 150km apart but within same state) and we got married.

    and since then i have registered my address in her home as Hauptwohnung while the other room changes to
    be nebenwohnung.

    and since then i have applied for a resident permit, based on our marriage “AUFENTHALTITEL NACH 28” in her city.

    But recently after 6 months of the city registrations i recieved a message from the auslanderbehorde in her city
    that my file was sent back to my previous city because it was assumed/believed that my predominant place of residence
    is where my studies is and hence i should go and apply for my resident card there.

    Can anyone try to explain what the meldegesetz says please or does this assumptions overrule the paper works/signature.
    1.) if thats the case why will the meldeamts (burger büro register me in the city initially?) register my address as hauptwohnsitz?

    Note;
    if i go ahead to apply for my card in the other city, its like am being forced to changed my hauptwohnung again
    Does that mean married couples are automatically separated if they work in different city or they are student in different city?

    Is this where the problem is? she is not working but her ausbildung start soon, though she is on sgb2 and her kids while i pay
    part of the rent in the house every month as calculated down by the arbeitsamts since i work as a foreign student (450eur).

    2.) if my wife will come to my school`s city to register her address as nebenwohnung while my address will also be on her address
    at the other city as nebenwohnung, will this suffice for my application according to the aufenhaltsgesetz nach 28?

    since we married the arbeitsamt deducted some money up to 400eur support, cos they belief she isnt alone again.

    3.) all things being equal, can we file a case against the arbeitsamts to claim this money back, since parts of the system isnt reconising

    us living together for now?

    Reply
  57. pinay

    hello.i wanna know what are the requirements renewing my residence card ?my card have been issued for two years since my passport will be valid only until end of next year.. can i still renew my residence card even my husband which is (eu) exit the germany? we have two children..3 and 5..

    Reply
  58. Max

    Hi there!

    This is an amazing and by far the most helpful post on the internet.

    I have a few questions regarding this:
    – We are a same-sex couple who just got married in Germany
    – I am an EU citizen who has been working in Germany 3 years and my husband is from Lebanon.

    My question is- does he have to go back to Lebanon to get his Residence Permit started or can he just do it from here?
    2. Proof of income- he does not work because he is not authorized but I am working, does that help as well?
    And that’s it 🙂

    Thanks!
    Max

    Reply
    1. Gus

      Hi Max,
      How did you solve your partner’s Residence Permit? Was he allowed to get it there without travelling back to Lebanon? When you said “married”, you mean same-sex parnertship, right?

      I am a EU citizen and I will move soon to Germany with my boyfriend (Non-EU).. So I am wondering what is the best thing we can do in order he can get a working permit.

      Thanks

      Gus

      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        Hi Gus,

        Well you are in luck because we just settled this last week.

        All in all, if you and your boyfriend are here and you want him to get residence permit and work permit, then get the same-sex partnership. Once you have that, he does not have to go back, he can do it all from here 🙂

        Make sure he has all the documents they need at the Standesamt and you have yours (although as EU citizen you need your passport and 1 document and done).

  59. Claudia

    Hello!
    What a helpful website and so informative to shed some light on the immigration policies in Europe!

    Here is my Q (yes for us LGBT couples it seems to be a little more complicated) below.

    The story: I am a German citizen, came here to the US 5 years ago through the Greencard lottery and met my partner (we are both ladies) shortly after. I am currently in the process of going through US naturalization, while maintaining my German dual citizenship at the same time. Once it’s complete, we are looking to spend a few years in Spain and work there. Also, we are currently not married here in the US, only have a domestic partnership certificate.

    Q 1: Is it advisable to get married before we leave the US, to make it easier for her to get permanent residency?

    Q 2: Where do we start the process, should we go to Germany first to get her permanent residency and are then allowed to freely move/live around the EU (Spain)?

    Q 3: Are there any complications we should consider, since same-sex partners are recognized in Germany and Spain, but only Spain allows marriages?

    Thank you so much for all the help, it’s much appreciated!

    Claudia

    Reply
  60. Mike

    Hello:

    My wife is a German national who has been living in the US for the past 20 years (Green Card). She accepted a job outside of Munich and we’ve all moved here as of the other day. I work for an American company which has an office in Munich. In order to continue working for said company I need to transfer to the local legal entity here in Munich. How do I get authorization to work for my company here in Munich? I’ve been married 15.5 years (married in the US). I will register with the city on Monday. What else is needed for the ability to work? This is all a bit confusing.

    Reply
  61. Alex

    Hello!

    I am a non-EU citizen currently studying a master’s in Germany (student visa) and living with my girlfriend. She is a EU-citizen (swedish) and has a full time job in Germany, earning around 1600 euros/month.
    We both are fluent in German and we would like to get married (apparently the easiest is to do it in Denmark). I would like to know what should I do after we get married to change my Aufenthaltserlaubnis from student to long term.

    Thank you!

    Alex

    Reply
  62. Anonymous

    Hi,
    I am working in Germany (Danish citizen) and my non-EU boyfriend is living with me here on a “looking for a job” visa. We are planning to get married. Will this marriage give him a residence permit even though he has not found a job within the time limit of his current visa?

    Reply
    1. Max

      Hey!

      Actually he doesn’t have to work. If you marry, he is immediately entitled to all EU rights with you :).

      I know this from personal experience.

      Reply
  63. mimi

    Hi. Thanks for the continues useful information you have provided. My question is,is it possible to extend a two week schengen visitor visa to the maximum 90 days after landing in Germany? I have searched online and i am getting the feeling that,it is only possible if the vistor is bed sick. kindly assist.

    Reply
  64. Moosa khan

    Hello
    I need to ask a quick question. I have recently received a residence permit in Germany as I’m a non EU family member (husband) of EU national and my wife is Slovak national and she is excercising treaty right in Germany. The residence card I have just received is valid for only one year. I have heard that it should be valid for 5 years. Do I need to contact any authority about this matter or is it just normal?
    Thanks

    Reply
  65. Anj

    Hi! My husband (an EU citizen) and I (non-EU) are planning to move to Germany to live and work there. I was wondering, since I’m required a visa to enter Germany, would I still need to register with the municipality as well?

    Reply
    1. Moosa khan

      If you are traveling together with your husband than under directive you don’t need any visa and marriage certificate with valid passport is enough for travelling and you will get entry visa at external border. And yes the first and important thing is to register with local municipality.

      Reply
  66. Aiger

    hello , i am a Non Eu Citizen of a third part country of Europe. Me and my wife intend to live in Germany. She is a EU Citizen. Can i have good possibilities to take the residence permit of 5 year (Aufenthaltskarte) even without finding a job first ? I have some adequate savings statements. Can these be used a good Proof or i should have monthly incoming for a Job as your case ? Because only after the residence someone can have the right to work. Looking forward to hearing from you . Thanks in Advance for your precious advices !!!

    Reply
  67. teme

    Hi,

    I am a US green card holder. .
    willing to move to Germany to get married from my EU citizen boyfriend. .
    what is required to get married in Germany
    if not holding a valid passport will that be OK as long as I got my personal information in my us permanent document as well as the refugee traveling document?
    Will I get recidency permit in Germany as soon as I get married from my EU citizen partner who is not German citizen…

    Thanks

    Reply
  68. Abdul

    Hello
    I am going to marry with german passport holder girl in london. I am non eu citizen. From Asia. My next plan is to go to germany in schenzen visa then i will do paper marriage in germany. Is it possible to do that? Can you please help me out about that situation.
    Thank you

    Reply
  69. Lenardo

    Thanks for your great works 🙂 Seems like most informative writing regarding German Residence Card (Aufenthaltskarte) through Marriage.I have some queries, and I would be grateful if you please try to sort them out.

    I am a non-EU citizen studying and living in Germany since 2015. My girlfriend is from Poland and we have planned to get marry soon to live and work in Germany.
    1. As I am a student and already registered in Germany and to get the residence permit plus the work permit does my girlfriend need to find a work first?
    2. I have a part time jobs where I get around 800 euros per month, Can we apply for a residence permit with a bank statement? If I show enough money to live for both of us?

    Regards,

    Reply
  70. Aliyan

    Hi
    I am on italy student visa and i want to marry i greek girl in germany.what documents i need to apply and after registering the marriage can we go to uk without visa or we need a visa for moving to uk

    Reply
  71. Anonymous

    i am german citizen married to a south african citizen. he is coming here to visit on spouse visa. can he be able to apply for a resident card under the spouse visa while is here?

    Reply
    1. Princess

      You South African spouse need to apply for Family reunion visa with German Embassy in Johannesburg then when he/she arrive in Germany, he/she can apply for Resident card to stay with you.

      Without Family Reunion visa (Grant) by the Embassy, She/He can not apply for resident card.
      I am also waiting for the embassy about my Family Reunion visa.

      Hope this helps.

      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        thanks for your answer. even though we got married in Germany, does he still need to get he family reunion visa?

      2. Princess

        Yes, he must exist and apply for Family Reunion visa even though you get married in Germany.

        I got Married in Denmark and i went to Germany with my spouse (German) then we both went to his city rathaus and register our Marriage certificate then they told us the same thing that i have read online ” Must go through German Embassy in my country or in country i have residence “.

        Dont make mistake, after marriage, he/she should go to German Embassy for Family reunion visa.

  72. Donco Gligorovski

    Hello,
    I am EU citizen and i live in Deutschland. My wife is not EU citizen, she is from Macedonia. She came to live with me here in Deutschland but we are registrated on diferent adress because we can not find a place to live together. Could be a problem that when we go to apply for Aufenthaltskarte?

    Thanks a lot

    Reply
  73. Taiwo

    Hello. Thanks for you post. My name is Taiwo from Nigeria (A non EU member state). I have a girlfriend from Norway (an EEA member state). We are planing to get married in Germany. I plan on coming to Germany with a Schengen visa. Can I do so, and can we get married on German soil. If we do so, can I get a residence permit? Please enlighten me.

    Kind regards.
    Taiwo.

    Reply
    1. Princess

      Hey Taiwo, Has a NG that you are, it difficult to do so. First, it will take German marriage registry up to 6months if not more to approve you to marry her. Best thing for you is to go to Denmark and marry her then go to German Embassy in Lagos or Abuja (Depend on what city u are) to apply for family reunion visa. You will need Start Deutsche A1(Language certificate) along with other documents before you can get Family reunion visa. If u are on viber or whatsapp, or drop me ur email. We can talk more because am from NG and am waiting Embassy reply for my FRU visa.

      Reply
      1. Agboola babtunde

        Good day
        I need advise,I am a nigerian and i have a France visa on December 2015 but I could not make the trip due to late information about the issuance of the visa till the visa expire in January 2016 but now I want reapply for the visa and my intention is to relocate to Germany and I need advise on what to do as soon as I get to Germany in other to secure my resident and work permit.
        I strongly need quality advise regarding this.
        Hope to read your reply.
        Regards.

      2. Princess

        I am happy to tell you guys i got my Family Reunion Visa today from the Embassy. I am been granted 90 days multiple entry to Germany. I will be in the city to process my residence card.

        🙂

  74. Abdul

    Hi..my wife is from
    Germany. We get married in uk in islamic marriage but not in paper. Now if i go to germany in schenzen visa can i do paper with her germany. I am
    Asian. After doing paper can i stay there?
    Please let me know

    Reply
    1. Princess

      Abdul, Islamic Marriage certificate is not allow (Not 100% sure) better for you to get Civil Marriage certificate before you enter Germany. If not you will be ask to go back and get it.

      Reply
  75. M

    I am Dutch living in Germany married to an Indian. We decided to live in Germany as there the EU law would apply, as I am Dutch and not German, allowing my in laws to come live with us. Based on the EU free movement right (so not based on the family reunion right) my in laws (Indian) last year got the Aufenthaltskarte for 5 years valid. Then they went to India, renewed their Passport, then a family member died and there was a wedding so they stayed for more than 6 months in India, without asking prior permission cause we did not know there was a 6 months rule. It seems to us however that the 6 months rule only applies to Aufenthaltstitel and not to Aufenthaltskarte. (to us there seems to be a difference in those, as my husband has an Aufenthaltstitel cause he applied based on his job rather than based on me being EU citizen. my in-laws got Aufenthaltskarte cause they applied based on the EU free movement right)

    The Aufenthaltstitel is based on Aufenthaltsgesetz 51 abs. 1, which mentions the 6 months rule (https://dejure.org/gesetze/AufenthG/51.html).
    The Aufenthaltskarte is based on EU Freizügigkeitsgesetz/EU, which does not mention the 6 months rule (https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/freiz_gg_eu_2004/BJNR198600004.html).

    According to paragraph 6.1: Der Verlust des Rechts nach § 2 Abs. 1 kann unbeschadet des § 2 Absatz 7 und des § 5 Absatz 4 nur aus Gründen der öffentlichen Ordnung, Sicherheit oder Gesundheit…

    The Aufenthaltsamt of our Region says the Aufenthaltsgesetz also applies to the Aufenthaltskarte, and that we need to give the details of their Aufenthaltskarte so they can terminate their Karte because they have stayed outside longer than 6 months. They say that my in-laws need to re-apply in India.

    Does our interpretation seem correct, that the 6 months rule should not apply for Aufenthaltskarte based on EU free movement right?

    Reply
  76. Afrim

    Hello,
    I’m Afrim from Kosovo ( Non-EU) . My fiance lives in Germany. We are planing to get married and decided to try and move to Germany. She was studying in Germany and had 3 year student visa, after that she got a job in the same place that she was doing practice work and applied for work and resident permit, got it for 3 years (November 2014- Nov 2017).

    Question is, after we get our married certificate and apply in German Embassy in my Country am I eligible to get residence permit , go there live and work ?
    If Yes
    What are sufficient monthly income that my fiance should have before i get there, and
    What is “enough room” is in terms of meter square (m2).

    Thank you in advance
    Afrim

    Reply
  77. Steph

    Hello and thank you for all this information.
    I have some question about my situation.

    I’m a Canadian citizen and I’m living in Canada right now, my boyfriend is EU citizen non German living in Germany and we want to get married. I want to go in Germany to live with him as soon as I finish school here. Now I’m a student so I don’t have a lot of incomes, what means I will need to work when I got there and I have not much saved.
    I’m just really lost with all what I read on a lot of website. I ask questions to the German consulate here in Canada and I got the answer that I can apply for a residence permit within the first 90 days of my arrival and then when we are married I can ask for a family reunion.

    The problem is I don’t know what to do first cause I saw that I need the marriage certificate to have the residence permit but I need the marriage certificate to get the residence permit. Iy’s a catch 22.

    I also have the problem that I can’t show a lease of where I will be living if I go join him where he already lives, it’s his name on the lease.

    I aslo can’t have a proof of employment if I’m not allowed to work, but I can’t work if I don’t already have the paper that allow me to work.

    What should I do?

    Thank you!

    Reply
    1. Steph

      I made I mistake, I mean I need the marriage certificate to have the residence permit but I need the residence permit to get married

      Reply
      1. madhavajay

        Get married in the Czech Republic, its really nice, easy and way cheaper anyway. Get your Czech Marriage certificate Apostilled and translated to German and you’re good to go. I have one so I should know. 😊

  78. Alex

    Hi, I am Non-EU citizen , me and my wife ( German Citizen) got married in Denmark last year . I came to Germany on Intra-company transfer and got a 3 year resident permit based on transfer.

    I want to change this intracompany resident permit for 3 year to family reunification. Am i allowed to do this change from inside Germany ? I am working and living since last 6 months in germany. What status and permit i will get?

    Please help and suggest – Thanks
    A

    Reply
  79. Jay

    I have an Aufenthaltskarte from my wife who is British. Obviously the brexit thing is throwing a lot of confusion into the air, should we consider looking at changing to a Blue Card? I have been living in Germany since 2013, but I am concerned that my right to Permanent Residency might be impacted by changing visas (iv been on two different ones previously) does anyone know about this? I have been fully employed for over well over EUR 50k a year for over 3 years but on 3 separate visa documents. Working Holiday Visa, then Sponsored Work Visa from my job, and now Aufenthaltskarte.

    Secondly, I can’t find any information on what the normal expiry conditions are for the Aufenthaltskarte? Lets say Brexit doesn’t change anything for the time being, can my wife and I leave Germany to say live in another country for a year or two and come back? The Aufenthaltskarte is valid for about 5 years.

    Any advice would be appreciated.

    Reply
  80. Pham Hien Minh

    Hi Admin,

    I am a non-EU spouse of a Spanish citizen. I have Spanish residence card and we are about to move to Germany as my husband is seconded to work there by his company.
    Regarding the requested documents to apply for a residence card in Germany, I have some questions for which I would really appreciate if you could clarify:

    1. I am not working and hence no income. Can I still apply for a residence permit?

    2. I don’t have a private insurance policy as in Spain I have my own social security card that gives me access to use public healthcare. To get the German residence card, do I need to have an insurance policy?

    3. Do all of the requested documents need to be translated in German?

    Many thanks,
    Minh

    Reply
  81. Anonymous

    Hello all,

    I am married to German citizen and i have right documents to live and work in Germany. I got a summer job in Scotland and Ireland, i will like to go but my husband is not going with me because he will be busy too in Germany.

    Do i need to apply for visa before going to Scotland or Ireland or not i dont need to apply?
    Do the Residence Card of a Family Member of a ( non-German ) EU citizen apply to me (non-eu)?

    I will be glad to read from anyone that understand my point.

    Regards
    P.

    Reply
  82. Kimberly Horgan

    Do I have to know the basics of the language before I apply or can I just show I’ve enrolled in a course upon arrival to learn?

    Reply
  83. M

    Hello, I am in Germany with a student visa valid for only 1 year. Me and my boyfriend (He is a German citizen) are planning to get married here in Germany. Would that be possible? any information is kindly appreciated. Thank you.

    Reply
    1. P

      Yes, you can marry your German boyfriend in Germany but the waiting period before the approval of you to get married is longer than waiting for Family reunion visa.

      It is better you guys go to Denmark and get married then return back to Germany and do other paper work.

      Regards

      Reply
  84. Steven

    Dear Administrator
    I am a retired Australian citizen receiving a good private pension. For the last 5 years I have had a living apart/together relationship with my German girlfriend. This year I plan to apply for residency in Germany so that we can be together on a more permanent basis. We do not plan to move in together at this stage in our relationship. You mentioned the 2 week requirement to register an address in Germany. It is likely going to take me longer than 2 weeks to get a permanent address and landlord contract (a lot of competition for apartments in Munich). I will be staying at a friend home for up to 6 weeks near my girlfriends apartment. Can I use this temporary address to register?

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Steven,

      To me it seemed to be a gray area about registering your address in two weeks. Do tourists who stay three weeks in Germany get in trouble for not registering? I highly doubt it. In my case I registered my address after being in Germany for around six weeks. The person in the city hall gave me a look but it turned out okay in that instance. You can even say you were traveling in France for the last month, there’s no way the person in the Rathaus can know if you were present in Germany or not.

      Best of luck

      Reply
  85. faz

    hi great artical
    im in same situation but my wife is working in Germany at the moment and she’s an eu citizen . I’m in spain at the moment i want to join her there . can you tell me do i need just her registration with town hall like with marriage certificate or we both need to register on same address. Thanks

    Reply
  86. Ali shah

    Hello Administrator..i am Ali currently living in italy without any residence card..i have german girlfriend from two years and she have house and job too in germany and we want to marry..so my question is if she come here and we get married is it possible that i travel with her without visa in germany with marriage certificate and live there and apply and wait till i get residence card in germany? i have enough saving and i also can speak good german..please tell if i can travel with marriage certificate to germany and do all registration in germany?
    Thankyou

    Reply
  87. stella

    i have never lived in Germany,but im getting married to a germany National soon,which kind of visa do we have to apply for incase for me to stay with my husband in germany?
    And what are the requirements needed?
    Thanks

    Reply
    1. Princess

      Hello Stella,

      I am also married to German. We got Married in Denmark and I return back to the country I am living to apply for visa.

      The visa you need to apply for is called FAMILY REUNION VISA. Every country with German Embassy as checklist for applicant, you should visit the one in your country and ask for that.

      In my own case, below are the list of documents I submitted to the Embassy and every documents as to have 2 copies each couple with the Original :

      – Application form
      – Marriage certificate
      – Int’l Passport
      – German Language certificate A1
      – Biometric passport photo
      – My spouse ID or Passport copy
      – My Spouse Registered Address document

      Note: If any of you as ever been married before and divorce, you need the “Divorce Decree” from the court of law that settle the divorce. If you or your spouse is a divorce, you need both from him and yours.

      Pictures from your marriage will be requested too.

      These are all documents I submitted to the Embassy. But make sure you contact German Embassy in your country because I lent to understand that in Africa they requested for more than what I listed above.

      Then you after you submits the documents you will have to wait 3 months for the processing before you can be granted your Family Reunion visa.

      In my case there were second interview that also involvedmy spouse too. We were both given the same time, I was at the Embassy n he was at Foreign Authority office in his city and we were been asked about our family, job, sport, house, food, how you meet etc.

      You and your spouse should know more about each other very well in other to be granted the visa.

      Wish you the best!

      Reply
      1. Brendan

        Hi, i am. Nigerian and have a latvian residence permit for studies then i got married to my longterm german girlfriend in Denmark and then moved to germany. But i didnt apply for residence permit in Dresden until my latvia residence permit expired. Now they rejected my application.. Reason being that i came into Germany with the wrong visa, and that i need A1 level of german language. I want to appeal but i dont know my chances

      2. Administrator Post author

        Hello Brendan,

        As I understand you aren’t required to have A1 German if your German wife has lived abroad in Denmark or anywhere in the EU (which means she would have “unregistered” from her local rathaus in Germany, and have some kind of government documents from Denmark).

        As I understand if you legally come to Germany, which I believe includes having a student visa that allows you to travel within the EU, then you can apply for a residence permit on the basis of being married to a German citizen. However if your student visa expired while you were in Germany and you hadn’t applied yet then I’m not sure what happens. Perhaps if you registered yourselves as living in another EU country as a married couple, and then applied again when you move back to Germany, this could be a solution — this is just a quick guess on my part though. In your case I’m not sure so I would recommend talking with someone who knows about the German immigration system.

        Best of luck
        Back to comment directory

  88. Esther

    Hello thanks for this post, I am a Nigerian and my boyfriend is a German citizen, he will be coming next month for us to get married here in Nigeria. I just finished my school and I am unemployed. After the marriage are we suppose to go to the embassy together for my visa or I am to go alone? Will they demand statement of my account since I am not employed? How long would they visa processing be? Please help me on what to do and the requirements that I need to get a visa to join my husband in Germany. Thanks

    Reply
    1. Princess

      Dear Esther,

      If your husband to be is a German and working then you don’t need to show proof of money or any statement.

      You don’t need to go to Embassy with your husband because it not require nor necessary.

      Visa processing is 3 months if you submitted all correct n complete require documents.

      Visit Germany embassy in Lagos or Abuja for Family Reunion visa Requirements. And also read above my previous post to Stella.

      Wish you the best.

      Reply
  89. Mark Hancock

    Hi, I am South African and my Wife is Portuguese, we currently live in South Africa, my company is transferring me to Germany. I have the original signed contract and it has already been approved by the German works council. So we do not have an address just yet and will be moving up like a week before my job starts. My wife will not have a job when we first arrive and will later look for one once the kids are settled in. My questions are: Is an EEA permit the best option for me? Does my wife have to register her stay first and then myself or can we do it together? I am going for a pre-trip a few months before but will probably just need a Visitors VISA first or should try get the ball rolling then?

    Any suggestions welcome

    Thanks

    Reply
  90. Teresa

    Hello Administrator,
    I’m an EU citizen who plans to bring her non-EU spouse to Germany. I have a question about the requirement of having €700 income per month.
    My spouse is a creative industries’ freelancer who doesn’t get regular deposits into his bank account. The deposits are irregular, sometimes fewer than €700, sometimes much larger sums. My question is — is it enough just to have certain amount of savings (say, €5000) to be eligible for Aufenthaltskarte? Thanks.
    Amazing resource btw, keep it up!

    Reply
  91. Toyin

    I have a german father but i live in Nigeria and married with a kid. Can my dad still pass his citizenship to me when i get to germany?

    Reply
  92. Alan

    I am from Hong Kong and my wife is a German citizen. How can I apply an Aufenthaltskarte? Moreover, Must I pass exam in German A1 language if I came together with my spouse to Germany ? Many thanks!

    Reply
  93. JERRY

    Hello,
    Im non EU married to my Spainish partner and we lived in Spain.
    I want to move to Germany because I can speak German and it’s more easy for me to get a job.
    Can I travel alone to Germany and look for Job while she will join me later.

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Jerry,
      If you have a Spanish residence permit I believe this allows you free movement anywhere in the EU. To be hired in Germany I believe you would need a German tax id number and probably a German residence permit that allows you to work. You are eligible for these based on your marriage and assuming you meet the minimum income and living requirements, however to get the tax id number and residence permit you and your wife would need to register a German residence at your local rathaus. Good luck

      Back to comment directory

      Reply
  94. Abid Ali

    Hallo sir,mye name is abid and i living in wollfenbütel.sorry sir i have some question i am working in hildesheim and living wolfenbüttel landkreis.i have some some problem i can in hildesheim for exampel some mye place bus not can go again i will can walking in haus can go.please say me i will changed mye haus i can go hildesheim landkreis i am asylum seeker please sir say me.

    Reply
  95. Freda

    Hello, I just wanted to ask, I live in Austria, and I have three year document in Austria, but next year in April I will be getting my five years document but I want to relocate to Germany what should I do and what will I need to stay I. Germany.

    Reply
  96. Cedric

    Good day Administrator, my wife is German and I am south african, she has never lived in Germany however she has a german passport. How would I go about my application? I mean, how do you work in Germany as a self employed person on a tourist Visa? Is that possible or do you need a working visa when you enter Germany before you apply as you have described?

    Reply
  97. Gladys

    Hello i am a Nigerian i am married to a german for 10years now we have 2 children 5 and 8years old our children were born in uganda and we registered their birthcertificate via the kampala embassy and they both got german citizen by blood. We are registered in the german embassy in uganda. Now my husband job just transferred him to other country that we do not like and we are moving to germany next year.

    I am planning to get into Germany with tourists visa and apply for a resident permit once i arrive. My german language skills is B1. My husband is working for a international company and he will return back after 4 weeks in Germany.

    My question is 4 weeks enough to get me a resident permit in Germany.

    We are moving to dusseldolf area and we are planning to buy a house or an apartment once we get there.

    Note. We are married in Ghana and marriage certificate was verified by the German embassy in accra

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Gladys — as I understand, once you are in Germany legally and make an application for a residence permit, you’re allowed to stay while the application is being processed. I say this based on Section 81 of the German Residence Act, “(3) If a foreigner who is legally resident in the federal territory and does not possess a residence title applies for a residence title, his or her residence shall be deemed to be permitted up to the time of the decision by the foreigners authority. If the application is filed too late, deportation shall be deemed to be suspended from the time of application up to the time of the decision by the foreigners authority.”

      Good luck!

      back to comment directory

      Reply
      1. Shah

        Hello. You are so nice guy and giving much beneficial information. I have question , please tell me I have a child from my partner. She is polish and child is polish. I am asylum seeker. Can I get Residence card ?

  98. Shibalal

    Hi Admin
    At first I came Germany in Student Visa. My visa was 6 months. But after five months I moved to Poland and apply for the TRC in Poland. After 4 month I received 3 years TRC card in Poland.
    Now I am planning to stay with my girlfriend in Germany so what can I do ??
    Can I get Aufenhalt in Germany with work permit? ?
    Any your suggestions we be appreciated.

    Reply
  99. Kimmie

    Hello, I’m from a non-EU country planning to get married to a German citizen in Denmark. My question is after getting married can I get my residence permit right away when we go back to Germany? Or I need to go back to my home country? What if I don’t have that much money in my account cause I was studying the language course for 3months and I decided to not work on those months? Is there going to be an issue? Thanks in advance!

    Reply
  100. rizwan

    We are living in UK but soon planning to go to Germany but i don’t have a Residence permit to work in the Germany I guess.

    I have searched some Residence Permit application Form as there are 2 forms, 1 need A1 Language test and other one doesn’t .

    Well i have a BBA (BA) degree from Pakistan, Will it be consider in order to exempt the A1 Language Certificate?

    And i have been living in UK since past 7 years and have a / Self Employed as a Teacher and run a Business in education.

    My question is do i still need to have an A1 language Test or is it exempted as i have a University Degree from Pakistan?

    Kindly send me a link for right application form for my visa application
    so that i would be able to complete all required documents required by the German embassy before i take an appointment.

    Many Thanks
    Kind Regards

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Rizwan,

      Are you married to a German citizen? If not, then I think you don’t have a language requirement. If you are, and your German spouse has been unregistered from Germany and registered in the UK or anywhere else in the EU for a few years (exercised her right of residence somewhere else), then I also think you are not required to meet the language requirement. Double check me on those but I think you should be okay.

      back to comment directory

      Reply
  101. Maggie

    Hi.am from kenya & my husband is German we seem to have trouble with health insurance company accepting me here in Germany while its a requirement for the residence card, which company would you recommend that won’t take me in circle its like a game btwn insurance &Ausländeramt both want proof so am just stuck here waiting & frustrated

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Hello Maggie,

      I pay about 35 euros per month and get insurance through a private foreign company: https://www.imglobal.com/travel-medical-insurance/patriot-travel-medical-insurance

      From what I’ve read this type of foreign private insurance is kind of a gray area for being accepted in Germany, and I suspect when I applied for the residence card I got lucky that the person looking at my application didn’t look too hard at my insurance.

      This insurance I linked to above is basically travel emergency health insurance so I wouldn’t recommend it for the long term, and if you use it to apply for your residence card then it’s difficult to switch to public German insurance once you get a job in Germany. I also believe this insurance I linked to won’t qualify you for a permanent/long-term residence permit after five years because it doesn’t include long-term-care (nursing home) insurance, though you may be able to find a policy for this separately from a private German company.

      This may be the most help for you: If I understand correctly, the German law says that if your spouse has a normal job contract and you earn less than 500 euros per month, then your spouse’s health insurance company must let on to your spouse’s health insurance policy. I’m not sure if this applies to private German insurance, but I believe it does apply to the “public” German health insurance companies (I think most Germans are on a “public” plan).

      This is what I’ve been able to figure out over my years of being in Germany, but take what I say with a grain of salt because I’m not an expert. Good luck!

      back to comment directory

      Reply
  102. Maahme

    My fiance is a german citizen living in germany and I’m an afghan national.what are the conditions for me to inter germany and how long it will take for me to get a permanent resident card ? And work permit?

    Reply
  103. Ali

    Hallo
    I’m Ali non-EU family member of romanian citizin, I am doctor and have residency card in romania do I have the right to work in germany if my wife stay in germany but she gas no work???

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      Hello

      Thank you for sharing your story.
      I have a question about the length of the spouse visa.
      I was told by my lawyer that usually the government issues 2 years of visa.
      Did you apply for 5 years term? I know that sometimes it depends on the person who takes care of your visa case at auslanderbehorde.

      Thank you

      Reply
  104. Annie

    Good afternoon. I am a German citizen not living in Germany at the moment. My husband and I are due to retire soon and would like to spend six months a year in Europe. How can we go about getting a permit for him so he does not have to leave the EU every three months with a visitors Visa? I looked at the spousal permit however we would not be able to live there for five years consecutively

    Reply
    1. Administrator Post author

      Greetings Annie,

      I can think of two possibilities — the first is applying for a three-month extension of the three-month travel visa. I’ve heard this is easily approved for foreign students who come to Germany just to study the language at a volkhochschule, so perhaps in your situation it would also be no problem.

      The other is applying for a residence permit for him (valid for 5 years by default as I understand) after you arrive to Germany. If you are retired with a pension and/or savings and have basic emergency health insurance while you’re staying in Germany I think you could qualify for this. I’m fairly certain you would if you were an EU-citizen married to a non-EU-citizen, however the conditions may be different for German citizens married to non-EU-citizens.

      There may be another way that’s designed better for your specific situation as well; perhaps someone else will leave a more relevant response for you.

      Best of luck

      back to comment directory

      Reply
  105. Jess

    Hello I am a Filipina moved in to Germany without acquiring German language certification and been given a visa which will expire on January 20th . I am married to a German and we have a child. What will possibly happen if I can not acquire a1 certification or learn the language. Would they send me back to the Philippines I don’t want my child to stay in Germany if the government will send me back to my country just because I can’t speak their language.

    Reply
  106. allan

    hi…
    i had get married to British in Cyprus 2009 then i get 5 years non eu family member resident permit from Cyprus then we divorced after 4 years …i had renewed my residency they issued also non eu family member we are not together any more my residency are valid until 2021
    so can i apply for any kind of residency in Germany ?

    Reply
  107. Rachi

    good afternoon , i am a moroccan nationality i married 10 years ago in italy , my wife she is italian a nationality , and i have italian residence permit ,my wife she is working in munchen 4 month i live with her , i whant to make a german resedence permit ,witsh decoment and way they need for that ,thank you very mutch

    Reply
  108. Rachi

    good afternoon , i am a moroccan nationality i married 10 years ago in italy , my wife she is italian a nationality , and i have italian residence permit ,my wife she is working in munchen 4 month i live with her , i whant to make a german resedence permit ,witsh decoment and way they need for that ,thank you very mutc

    Reply
  109. Julia

    Hello, I am a German and my husband is South African. He recently moved to Germany and it takes 3 years until he gets his German citizenship. My question would be how long does he need to stay in Germany at a time as he got an indefinite job offer in another EU country?

    Reply
  110. Jugjeet

    Hi,
    I am living at asylum in Germany and I am a Non-Eu national. I am doing job legally since last 2 years and now I get married with Romanian national.
    I have Romanian marriage certificate and I am living with my Romanian wife together in Germany since February.
    My question is, how I can apply German residence card?
    What documents should I have with me and what is tha processs to apply residence card.

    Regards:

    Reply

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